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Reference: 4.6L Plastic Intake Manifold Replacement Guides/Experiences

Discussion in 'Ford Crown Victoria' started by Robert44, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. Robert44

    Robert44 Member

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    I'm starting this thread To help people that need to replace their cracked/defective Intake Manifolds.
    Tell us your experiences and your stories.
    What car/truck do you have your cracked/defective Intake Manifold on?
    Have you had yours replaced?
    Did you do it or did you have it done at a shop?
    Do you have any tips that would make the job easier? Special tools/Other parts that should be replaced at the same time as the manifold. Oddball type wrench/tool that you used? etc. etc.
    What Brand of manifold did you install?
    What do you think the best aftermarket replacements are?
    How much did you pay to have the manifold replaced?
    How long should it take to get the job done??
    etc. etc.
    Bimmerknut likes this.
  2. Ashzo77

    Ashzo77 New Member

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    i had one melt on me, completely. it's actually fiberglass, and plastic
  3. Dominick

    Dominick Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    Starting in 1996, Ford began installing a DuPont Zytel nylon-composite intake manifold onto the 2-valve SOHC engines. Plaintiffs in class action lawsuits alleged that the coolant crossover passage of these intake manifolds may crack, resulting in coolant leakage. A US class-action suit was filed on behalf of owners, resulting in a settlement announced on December 17, 2005.
    Starting with the 2002 model year, and implemented halfway through the 2001 lineup, Ford began using a revised DuPont Zytel nylon-composite intake manifold with an aluminum front coolant crossover that corrected the issue. Replacement intakes were also made available for 1996–2001 engines.[31][32] To be eligible for reimbursement, one should have sought reimbursement from a Ford, Lincoln or Mercury dealer within 90 days of December 16, 2005. Further, Ford offered an extended warranty for this part, for seven years from the start date (which means the initial vehicle sale date) without a mileage limitation.[31]


    The following vehicles were included in this class-action suit settlement:
    [edit] Spark plug issues

    2-valve 4.6 L, 5.4 L, and 6.8 L engines found in many 1997-2008 Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury vehicles have an issue with stripped or missing spark plug threads in the cylinder heads. Ford acknowledges this issue in TSB 07-21-2 as well as earlier TSB's. Ford's TSB does not state that this issue is caused by owner neglect. Ford's only authorized repair procedure for out-of-warranty vehicles is to use the LOCK-N-STITCH aluminum insert and tool kit. For vehicles under the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, Ford will only cover the replacement of the entire cylinder head, however, the Ford recommended spark plug service interval extends beyond the duration of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. [33]
    3-valve 5.4 L and 6.8 L engines built before 10/9/07 and 3-valve 4.6 Ls built before 11/30/07 found in many 2004-2008 Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury vehicles have an issue with difficult to remove spark plugs which can cause part of the spark plug to become seized in the cylinder head. The source of the problem is a unique plug design that is made with a 2-piece shell, which often separates, leaving the lower portion of the spark plug stuck deep in the engine. Ford acknowledges this issue in TSB 08-7-6 as well as earlier TSB's. Ford's TSB does not state that this issue is caused by owner neglect. The TSB provides a special procedure for spark plug removal on these engines. For situations where the spark plug has broken in the head, Ford distributes multiple special tools for removing the seized portion of the plug. The multiple procedures required for the different cases/situations of plugs seized in these engines are explained in the TSB. This repair is covered for vehicles under warranty, however, the Ford recommended spark plug service interval extends beyond the duration of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.[34]
    Federal-Mogul, parent company of Champion Spark Plug has redesigned the original 2-piece design, with a 1-piece machined shell, eliminating the separation problem
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2010
    clt2021, electro, Robert44 and 4 others like this.
  4. Dominick

    Dominick Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    We stocked every updated manifold that Ford made and couldn't keep them in stock.
    Ford was fairly liberal in replacing them under warrenty.
    But the ones they didn't made a lot of people very unhappy.
    In the same token I sold a lot of these to garages.
    It just a very poor design in the beginning but the updated ones held up very well by putting
    aluminum inserts in the runners.
  5. Poppy

    Poppy Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    Dominick.. once again, you are on the job!
    I would be interested in seeing the plug removal proceedure recommended in this TSB 08-7-6 if anyone has access to it.
  6. Dominick

    Dominick Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    I bet Missinformation can come up with it:)
  7. Dominick

    Dominick Well-Known Member Respected Member

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  8. Poppy

    Poppy Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    Thanks Dom :)

    I have a 4.6L in my 99 crown vic.
    There was a fine hair line crack in the front passenger side, followed later by one on the driver's side into the thermostat housing, and I attempted repairs of them, here's my story, snipped from a thread I started on the issue on another site.

    I contacted Dupont (they make the zytel nylon that the intake is made out of,) and asked what is the best adhesive to use to bond to it. They recommended a few companies, but I settled on a relatively high temp "Plastic Weld" it is made and marketed by Permatex. It is rated to withstand temps up to about 250 F. I am hoping that will be high enough. Considering the thermostat is about 195.

    http://www.permatex.com/products/Au.../Permatex_PermaPoxy_5_Minute_Plastic_Weld.htm

    The intake manifold with the aluminum crossover tube goes for approx $400 with gaskets.
    I think the book give 6 hours labor.

    So now that the weather is getting better one of these days I'm going to give it a shot.
    Considering that the crack doesn't seem to have gotten anyworse these last 5 months, I'm guessing that there is not a lot of stress where mine is cracked, and I have somewhat high hopes that the plastic weld fix will hold up. If not... I guess I'll make a party out of it.
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2010
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  9. Poppy

    Poppy Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    I guess it was in April 2009 that I got around to using the Plastic Weld on the intake. I was able to repair it from the inside by removing the thermostat housing. Here we are in September and the repair held up. But I developed another crack that was significant, at the rear passenger area. It was time to bite the bullet and replace the intake, that was September 2009.

    Fortunately the prices came down. $320 at autozone and it was in stock, and the gaskets are built in.

    While doing the job, one of the intake manifold bolts was impossible to get to without removing the wiper assembly and the black plastic cowel... ah just too much work for one little bolt. Instead I drilled an access hole through the lower part of the assembly under the hood, and repaired the hole with duct tape. Also there was an extra long bracket that wasn't holding anything that was in the way of installing the new part. I guess the new and the old were shaped just a little bit differently. Again... to get at the bolt that held the bracket in place, would have required removal of the cowel... out came the cut off saw. Hmmm... it seems that part of that bracket is missing :rolleyes:

    Shortcuts are allowed when I work on my own cars. :)
    If I were a mechanic and was charging a customer for the job, I guess I would have to charge for the additional time.

    At any rate, I guess the point of this post is to say, that the plastic weld held up pretty well, but by time the unit starts to fail, it is likely that it will fail in multiple places within a year. At least that was my experience.
    Robert44 likes this.
  10. Dominick

    Dominick Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    Great:)
    You may have just saved some people a lot of time.
  11. MissInformation

    MissInformation New Member Respected Member

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    Awwww Shucks Dom.... :blush2:

    Thanks 'eh.... :smilewinkgrin: And for the record, I do have that TSB, but I was up rather late last night with José Cuervo..... :ihih: So this is what happens when a girl sleeps in.... :sleep: :lol:

    Good Job with the Link to the TSB Dominick! :thumbsup:
    Dominick likes this.
  12. Dominick

    Dominick Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    You were out with Joe The Plumber Geesh:confused:
  13. Country John

    Country John New Member

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    Just replaced mine in a 1999 P73. Bought it off ebay for $188., my guy (professional mechanic) installed it with new injectors for $100. Crack was on the water crossover tube and was spurting water into the alternator. The vehicle also had vacuum issues that caused cold start problems. This went away with the new IM. The OE IM developed issues at the heater tube orifice that I repaired a few years ago; it was dripping coolant into plug well #1 causing all kinds of trouble.

    The OE is a bad design. Bit the bullet and do your Crown Victoria a favor, replace it. Performance will improve and you will have a happy car.

    By the way, I added a DK permanent air filter a month ago and, cripes, what a difference in performance. The car breathes much easier and gas mileage has improved. This car runs like the day it rolled off the lot - beautifully.
    Dominick likes this.
  14. mark v

    mark v Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

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    Very informative thread, I did not know about the lawsuit before and the TSB about the plugs should be a recall!
  15. Dominick

    Dominick Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    I think It should be also.
    Expensive repair.
  16. Robert44

    Robert44 Member

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    I found a good link with instructions and pictures for a 4.6L
    Autoclinix.com: Ford/Lincoln/Mercury Intake Manifold Repair
    Dominick likes this.
  17. mark v

    mark v Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

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    Thank you for sharing this link.

  18. electro

    electro Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

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    IIRC the new Intake Manifolds from Ford do not come with the new gaskets, but the Dorman after market replacement does come with gaskets. I have done the job both ways, and the aftermarket manifold works just fine. Rock Auto has 'em for less than $180.00

    Attached Files:

  19. Bimmerknut

    Bimmerknut New Member

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    As my name suggests I'm a classic BMW enthusiast. That being said, I'm fairly mechanically inclined. My wife, before we met owned a 1998 Mercury Marquis. It suffered an overheat issue and after a little research I found the recall, but it was too late to have the work done and have it covered.

    So we bought a kit on ebay for $218 from AM-Autoparts. The Marquis has the same issue as previously mentioned with the large plastic enclosure that houses the windshield wiper mechanism grossly prevents adequate access to the back bolt that holds the large bracket (p/n 2 23 98)that mysteriously supports something on the intake manifold as well as provides secure points for the throttle cables. After 2 days I JUST did get the back bolt on for that bracket. Got the intake torqued, the fuel rail put back on, the spark plug adapters in and when I go to put the intake on, I find that the post on the bracket rests on one of the torqued bolts for the manifold and so the intake won't bolt down. Needless to say I am just livid! I've loosened that back bolt so the bracket moves freely but to no avail. It seem the ONLY was to rectify this is to remove that damn impossible bolt, slide the bracket out and cut about 3/8" off the end of the bracket stand-off.

    Anyone have any similar issue with that bracket riding too high to allow the intake to be bolted down?
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2010
  20. Poppy

    Poppy Well-Known Member Respected Member

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    I assume that you and I are talking abou the same bracket I referred to above in post #9.

    While doing the job, one of the intake manifold bolts was impossible to get to without removing the wiper assembly and the black plastic cowel... ah just too much work for one little bolt. Instead I drilled an access hole through the lower part of the assembly under the hood, and repaired the hole with duct tape. Also there was an extra long bracket that wasn't holding anything that was in the way of installing the new part. I guess the new and the old were shaped just a little bit differently. Again... to get at the bolt that held the bracket in place, would have required removal of the cowel... out came the cut off saw. Hmmm... it seems that part of that bracket is missing :rolleyes:

    Shortcuts are allowed when I work on my own cars. :)
    If I were a mechanic and was charging a customer for the job, I guess I would have to charge for the additional time.

    I vaguely recall someone mentioning that bracket is probably used at the factory as a lift point when installing the engine.
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2010

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