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Performance oil, engine rebuild

Discussion in 'Engine, Transmission/Axle & Driveline/Axle' started by dudeguything, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. dudeguything

    dudeguything Member

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    95 ford e150 5.0 v8
    So im getting a rebuilt engine and im pretty set on getting amsoil put in it but ive heard its good to use regular oil to break in an engine.
    Supposedly royal purple has a "break in" oil they suggest using before using their other oil?
    Thoughts?
  2. pkevins

    pkevins Active Member Respected Member

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    What does the rebuilder and/or camshaft supplier recommend? I assume since you're concerned because it's a flat tappet engine and this post answers from that perspective.

    IMHO, I think the replies by werbyford in this recent thread on high performance builds makes as much sense as any, particularly the point about ensuring the engine will start with minimal cranking. The post by BarryR, a highly respected and winning engine builder, notes lots of options.

    Regardless, it's always a good idea to pre-lube before you crank it.

    Personal experience 1: I had '66 289 rebuilt in '09 with a mild performance cam. Delo 15W-40 plus a dollop of ZDDP worked great; tho' I suspect the additive was a waste of money. Anyway, 30,000 miles later it still ran great when I sold it.

    Personal experience 2: A friend of mine lost a camshaft in a vintage Mini rebuild last summer; although there was speculation the excessive cranking (with consequent fuel dilution) was at fault. But most likely it was the ceramic lifters on a camshaft not designed for them; reinforcing that clear understanding about the camshaft and lifters are critical.

    Kevin
  3. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

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    I believe your thread title is performance oil after rebuilding engine. And it can be a heated topic on some forums.

    With all of the links above if you can get a little zinc in the engine that will help with the engine break in and wear. However there is going overboard as well. After the break in as far as oil, I am a fan of regular dino oil for stock, daily driver or hobby car use. In fact I use oil I buy at Walmart. Oil has weight and then has a service spec. (There are additives too and I will get to that) My classic cars were built when the service spec was SD for gasoline engines. That service spec has been updated to SN. Which is to say a whole lot improved from older classifications. I came to this conclusion based on a lubrication class I took in college and speaking with engineers at Ford Motor Company. This isn't sexy or dramatic or special.

    As to additives, they wear out and that is one of the reasons to change oil. For daily drivers I change in the spring and the fall and the oil which I think is the key not expensive oil. In addition I use a Motorcraft oil filter.

    Frequent oil changes, oil that meets a high service spec, correct weight and a Motorcraft filter. Beats $50 + oil changes. Especially if your classic ride has a leak or burns a little.

    >>>>>>>>>>>Action
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  4. dudeguything

    dudeguything Member

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    Well i might very well be towing with this vehicle and i plan on taking it cross country so its important to me that i use performance oil. i dont mind more expensive changes especially with all the research and testimonies that come with Amsoil. Im also totally into the idea of swapping this engine out to another similar van if the body happens to get any serious issues. I plan on working nomadicly so its an integral long term investment.

    Im wondering with what specifically to break in the motor if necessary. Ill look into Amsoils zinc treated products or additives to add to regular oil for the break-in, as thats what it seems is being suggested here.
    sorry kevin but that was a whole lot of foreign language im not familiar with.

    "pre-lube before i crank it"? as in some sort of grease or do you mean conventional oil? additive?

    ZDDP?

    rebuilder is quoted as saying "roller cam in real good shape as well as push rods and roller lifters, everything else is brand new"
  5. dudeguything

    dudeguything Member

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    Also, does anyone know the total engine oil capacity for the 5.0 302? Pretty sure mine takes 5-6 quarts as is but im not sure how much goes into the torque converter.
  6. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

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    Engine oil capacity is in the owner's manual. Should be 6 quarts for trucks. Zero engine oil gets to the torque converter. A torque converter is an automatic transmission part.

    ZDDP is an additive. The Z stands for Zinc

    Pre-lube - Meaning to pre-lube the engine with engine oil by cranking the engine without starting the engine. This can be done by disabiling the coil or some other ignition part such that there is no spark.

    With engine out of the vehicle pre-lubing can be done by operating the oil pump. This is done with the distributor removed. Powering a hex shaped shaft to the oil pump.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>Action
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
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  7. dudeguything

    dudeguything Member

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    sorry, i guess im thinking of transmission fluid
  8. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

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    No worries.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
  9. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

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    Priming oil pump with distributor removed. Here is a vid. Not the best vid in the world and you can get the idea from this. Just don't want to drop anything down the distributor hole. If you do that tends to change the course of events for that day.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action

    https://video.search.yahoo.com/sear...18a5326c8b8956bb29c97c03234220b5&action=click
  10. pkevins

    pkevins Active Member Respected Member

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    OK - with a roller camshaft, the concern about zinc and all of the other debates I linked with respect to "performance" confused things, My bad and I apologize for bringing up issues that were not necessary.

    Action's first reply makes perfect sense. Just go with the viscosity and break-in intructions from the rebuilder.
    Kevin
  11. 70XL

    70XL Active Member

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    From the rebuilder's quote, it sounds like the cam, lifters and push rods are being reused. Roller lifters and cam don't really need a special break-in procedure, like flat tappet components and the reused components are already broken in. The bearings a ring seating still need to take place, so priming the oiling system is always a good idea to minimize any dry start issues. This sounds like a completely stock rebuild, so there is no need for any special oil, or performance oil, or anything like that. Just change the oil after the first run, or first hundred miles, or so, so you can inspect the oil and see if anything is coming apart in the new engine. You may even want to cut open the oil filter, too. You're looking for metallic residue showing signs of bearing wear that should not be happening. So, a couple of quick oil changes with regular, cheap oil to make sure the rebuild is good, then run whatever oil you wish and change oil and filter regularly for good long engine life.

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