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2009 Escape - 2.5 L -FWD 115,000 miles

Purchased new - great car - no problems until about 5 months ago. Initial problem: Engine loses power at highway speed – driving 70 car slows down erratically to 40 – 50 range. Sometimes will pick back up sometimes will not.
Took to Ford dealer – replaced throttle body – did not help. Replaced accelerator pedal – did not help. Replaced wires from throttle body to firewall – did not help. Replaced battery – did not help. Replaced computer – problem solved. Second Problem: Within a week check engine light comes on - back to Ford dealer. Ford dealer checked problem – codes were for “lean misfire”. They checked injectors and coils – they are OK. Ford recommendation – complete engine overhaul.

As a 1960's vintage mechanic I elected to run some checks. Reset check engine light, drove until light came back on. Used friends diagnostic tool – “random misfires” identified. Checks revealed all 4 injectors ports leaking, all O rings very bad. Installed new injectors, also new coils. Problem minimized check engine light comes on occasionally, usually at low speed and +/- 2500 rpm, “misfire cylinder 2” identified. Ran compression check – 175, 170, 170, 175 cylinders 1 through 4. Engine runs smooth – Can not detect engine misfire by ear - I can’t believe an engine overhaul is required.

Would like comments as to problem and potential fix.
 

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2009 Escape - 2.5 L -FWD 115,000 miles

Purchased new - great car - no problems until about 5 months ago. Initial problem: Engine loses power at highway speed – driving 70 car slows down erratically to 40 – 50 range. Sometimes will pick back up sometimes will not.
Took to Ford dealer – replaced throttle body – did not help. Replaced accelerator pedal – did not help. Replaced wires from throttle body to firewall – did not help. Replaced battery – did not help. Replaced computer – problem solved. Second Problem: Within a week check engine light comes on - back to Ford dealer. Ford dealer checked problem – codes were for “lean misfire”. They checked injectors and coils – they are OK. Ford recommendation – complete engine overhaul.

As a 1960's vintage mechanic I elected to run some checks. Reset check engine light, drove until light came back on. Used friends diagnostic tool – “random misfires” identified. Checks revealed all 4 injectors ports leaking, all O rings very bad. Installed new injectors, also new coils. Problem minimized check engine light comes on occasionally, usually at low speed and +/- 2500 rpm, “misfire cylinder 2” identified. Ran compression check – 175, 170, 170, 175 cylinders 1 through 4. Engine runs smooth – Can not detect engine misfire by ear - I can’t believe an engine overhaul is required.

Would like comments as to problem and potential fix.
See if this helps
http://www.fordforumsonline.com/threads/2009-ford-canister-purge-valves-multiple-codes.12160/
 

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Typically mis-fires detected by the EEC system are electronic in nature. The cause may be electronic as well. Or not.

A lean mixture can cause a misfire. Which could be a vacuum leak, an injector that is partially plugged, a weak spark plug, the computer not getting input (fast enough or at all) so makes the fuel mixture lean.

Based on your compression numbers the internal engine is healthy.

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I had a recent "random misfire" on my 1997 Crown Vic. New coils, new plugs, and new wires helped for a few weeks. Replaced fuel injectors and seals after hearing an uneven tapping sounds from injectors. "Random misfire" turns back up and this time I wanted to cure the problem. I had read elsewhere about the fuel evap system causing a problem.It turned out to be a solenoid in the evap system that was always open. Replaced and the old girl purrs like a kitten again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will be checking out the evap valve this week end. Will post the result - Thanks to both you and Dominick for pointing out this possibility. I'm also intrigued by the possibility that the problem arose (perhaps coincidently) after the work including computer replacement on the throttle body. Is it feasible that an electrical problem might be triggering the misfire code? There is no noticable performance that indicates a misfire.
 

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I will be checking out the evap valve this week end. Will post the result - Thanks to both you and Dominick for pointing out this possibility. I'm also intrigued by the possibility that the problem arose (perhaps coincidently) after the work including computer replacement on the throttle body. Is it feasible that an electrical problem might be triggering the misfire code? There is no noticable performance that indicates a misfire.
http://www.fordforumsonline.com/threads/ford-escape-fusion-recall-13n03-13b17-latest-info.11867/
 

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I'm having the same issue and replaced the plugs, coils, injectors, evap solenoid and the PCM and still have the #1 cylinder misfire code P301 (permanent) It's really pissing me off! My neighbor said the wire harness might be bad so I took a week and tested each wire with a meter from the fuse block to their connection and found 1 ground to be loose. Still have the misfire code
I was just told to rebuild the engine. My problem is, if there is no leaks, no compression issues, no head gasket issues, no knocks, pings, clunks, or ticking, why would I rebuild the engine?
I still think it's an electrical issue, but where?
 

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The P 301 code is a misfire, generated by the crankshaft position sensor.
When that cylinder comes around, it does not turn the crankshaft as far as compared to the other cylinders.

The ignition system could be perfect and that code is still generated because there is not enough fuel to support a full combustion cycle. Meaning ... that cylinder has a lean air/fuel ratio!

You did not state year and mileage of your vehicle. (on this 4 1/2 year old thread) So in general .......

Maybe all of them are lean and that one is just a little leaner than the rest.
Or there is a lean condition related to that one hole.

The first condition I stated may be from a slow O2 sensor. As the O2 sensors age they wear out. As they wear out the signal they report is slow. A slow signal to the PCM means the PCM is making air/fuel ratio adjustments on a single RPM basis on old data bring reported from the O2 sensor. You will NOT get an O2 sensor OBD code for this situation. That is because the O2 sensor IS sending a signal. Which is the test for a good O2 sensor. There is no test for how fast an O2 sensor sends the signal.
If your O2 signals have 100,000 miles or more, they need to be replaced as a maintenance item. Just like you would replace spark plugs.

The second condition I stated above is a vacuum leak. That leak can be anywhere from the throttle body to that cylinder. And it is likely to be a rather small leak. Do leak checking procedures to find it.

As to rebuild the engine, yeah that will fix it!!! (Well maybe) However it is an over repair. Why stop there? Just replace the vehicle. Stop taking advice that is not backed up by logic. Rebuilding an engine will fix internal engine issues. Bolt on the same engine controls and those controls may generate the same codes! If you have replaced the plugs, coils, injectors, evap solenoid and the PCM, you can fix this code without rebuilding the engine. An engine rebuild because it was worn out would generate a lot more codes than just one. And a compression test would be needed to confirm the health of the engine. My guess is if you did a compression test the results would be good.

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