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Thanks for sharing!

The stand out Falcon event for me was on a visit to Tucson in the early 1970s. I lived in Michigan and was enrolled in college in an Automotive Service program. I took some side classes on machining. My mom went to Tucson to get a doctorate at the U of A. I visited her at one point I think it was on spring break. There was a guy in the apartment complex my mom was living at that was rebuilding the engine in his early 60s Falcon wagon. It was a six cylinder that was removed and in pieces in the back of the wagon. He was doing an overhaul in the parking lot. He showed me what he had done and was going to do.

I could not believe what I was seeing! He had a new set of pistons that he was installing into the block in the back of a wagon in a parking lot and the wind was blowing. He was a student at U of A and was rather proud of the engine work he was doing. I always wondered if he got it reassembled and how long it lasted.

I wasn't much into six bangers. I am still that way however I have a lot more respect for that engine. Later that decade I bought my first and only new car. A 1978 Ford Granada Coupe with (wait for it) a 250 six banger. The only six I ever owned. Besides it being a six, the engine did better than I expected.

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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Got some new parts in...
The new front bumper and mounting bolts are here. The bumper got here two days early.
And have the new dash. Comes with all hardware including new sending units for Fuel, Temp and Oil. I just noticed it doesn't have a rev limit indicator. I need to read the instructions, maybe it has something.
We'll go ahead and put the bumper on probably next weekend, but wait until the exhaust manifold is done before doing the dash.
The new exhaust manifold and associated parts are on the way, should be here Wednesday, 4/14.
Bob


48467


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48470


48471
 

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Dash looks real nice and with added gaugee, looks like form follows function ...


What dash is that in your 3rd pic?

Dash in my 3rd '63 pic' is from an early Ford Comet and go pedal is Speed King Kik drum'. Jet-Age cues, not really customized, just personalized...

hav e fun


'61 Comet has Jet Age cockpit from the MEL design studios (with fender Gunsights):

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Cool looking car! I don't remember seeing those tail lights on anything when I was a kid and I go back pretty far!
 

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Those manifold bolts are going to be a bear to remove for sure. The problem is they're longer than most and long bolts are weaker than shorter bolts. And with the thread in the head being the résistance the bolts are more likely to twist. Many manifolds have the bolts at a flange in between the exhaust ports and not going thru the full thickness of the manifold. It's best to plan on them breaking, like many have said use plenty of penetrating oil and if one breaks keep going and remove the head as it's going to be too loud to drive anyway.

I'd buy some of this as it's the best I have used

48474


A friend of mine recommended it to me when he was a commercial washer repair guy who worked on laundromat machines that were always rusted for obvious reasons. Back then sears sold it but over the years I have been buying the Supco brand.

Also heat always helps when removing rusted bolts. The expansion helps break down the bond between two metals as they expand when heat travels thru them. Even when both metals are the same. Better when dissimilar metals are used and different densities as the thinner metal heats faster and expands breaking the bond and the penetrating oil can get it

Good luck!
 

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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Hi,
Thanks for that info. I'll definitely get some, it would help with other projects.
I'm on the waiting list at the local NAPA service center. Normally I would attempt to R&R the manifold, but with the very good possibility that at least a couple bolts would break, I decided against it. If (when?) any bolts would break I don't have the tools needed to proceed with removing them.
Thanks,
Bob
 

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I realize you have an appointment. And why don't you remove the head with the exhaust manifold attached and give it to NAPA to split the two and true up the surfaces, ]
With the saved money buy the better replacement exhaust manifold.

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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Good suggestion, and if was much younger I would seriously entertain it. But with all the things attached that would need to be removed it's a bit more than I want to do at this point.
I'll tinker all day and night on cars, but my days of opening up the engine are over.
Bob
 
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No worries


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In my experience the long bolts are the same size all the way. The shorties brake because the rear end of the thread is exposed to open air. They can rust from both ends.
Opening up the six is almost no hassle but if you feel you shouldnt do it thats wise. Know your limitations.
 

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... appears to be more than we are willing to risk at this point

... when you do get around to it, if you can find someone willing/capabe to do a 'valve job', it's not considered difficult on the Falcon six. A fresh 'valve job' can rejuvenate the anvil strong little six. Often the basic engine (bottom end) can be left undisturbed and head taken to machine shop or swapped at a box store. Valve grind or replaced, broken fasteners repaired and usually the head has manifold and block side milled flat. With 'valve job' the milling can kick up the compression ratio a little as well to enhance the six's performance.

hav e fun

Swapped a Dagee' 4 spd into the '63 Wagon 170 for the 3OTT. . Later used a low-miles Maverick 170 and added a T5 for the overdrive. The '63s 170 has head milled seriously and runs a 'steel shim' (thinner) head gasket to push CR to approaching 10:1. Gets good mileage and is quite peppy. (on 93 octane).

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That’s beautiful.
 

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Action and Powerband,

No worries from me, I enjoy the discussion. Interesting history.
I was 7 years old in 1960 so I was not into cars at that time. I remember my Grandfather bought a new 1960 Falcon Station Wagon. One day he gave me a ride to school and we passed by a couple of my buddies who were walking to the bus stop, Grandpa didn't stop for them. I caught hell from them for that. At that time the Falcon was a tiny car compared to the rest of Detroit's offerings, Grandpa's previous car was a late 50s Pontiac Chieftain, it was huge. So anyhow, my friends started making comments like "Hope it doesn't run over a piece of bubble gum, it'll get stuck" and other wiseacre cracks. Funny how I can still see their faces saying that.
It was in the late 60s when I was in high school that I got involved with cars. I was in Auto Shop and one of my friends parents gave me a 1962 Falcon Futura with the 144ci six and 3 on the column when they were transferred to another state. That poor old engine was worn out, wouldn't hold oil pressure for anything and 1st gear was gone. I burned up clutches left and right from starting in 2nd gear. I started working as a janitor at the local base NCO Club, one of the guys there had a 65-ish 289 Mustang 3-speed on the floor that got accordioned by a drunk driver. I bought it off him for $150 and me and a couple buddies swapped the powertrain into the Falcon, between using the high school auto shop during the school year and the base Auto Shop during the summer we got it done in about 9 months.
I had to sell it when I got married and joined the military. The guy that bought it still posts pics on FB periodically. He drag raced it on weekends and one night lost control and totaled it. Sadly, he lived.....
Bob
That is a great story! I still have my 63.5 Sprint V8, owned it for 52 years. To long of story to put here. Just did a LOAD of body work and paint. OEM 260, punched 30 over, 4100 carb, 4 spd (T10) on floor.
48514
 

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Nice Car! My first car was a 63 Sprint. Baby Blue 260 but only a 3 speed on the floor. I was too young to know what I had and it ended up in the scrap yard.
 

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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
That's nice!

I had a 63.5 Sprint in Windsor White and Rangoon Red interior for a few years in the 00's. It was a Frankenstein car - parts from here, parts from there, parts from who knows where. When the water pump started leaking I took it to the local parts store and the guy found it was from a '65 289. It had the 2-speed automatic. I had some brake work done and again found out the rear axle was from a 64-65 car.

I'm not complaining about the above, I just fell in love with it when I saw it. Given the age of the car, it doesn't surprise me that many parts were mixed in. And it sounded great with Thrush mufflers on dual pipes.

One complaint I got always got was how the front fender "Sprint V8" emblems were arranged. I liked them that way.

The pics below were one of the ways it looked while I had it. I also had the 13" spinner hubcaps.

I sold it when I bought the new Challenger.

Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Vehicle Car


48519
 

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Dash looks real nice and with added gaugee, looks like form follows function ...


What dash is that in your 3rd pic?

Dash in my 3rd '63 pic' is from an early Ford Comet and go pedal is Speed King Kik drum'. Jet-Age cues, not really customized, just personalized...

hav e fun


'61 Comet has Jet Age cockpit from the MEL design studios (with fender Gunsights):

. .
Is there a roll cage in that car?
 
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