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The "donut" type gasket seal fits into the manifold outlet hole. That hole is chamfered to hold the donut and center it. The pipe fits inside the "donut" and has a metal flange that surrounds the donut on the outside.. The goal is to center the gasket and make a tight seal that very little surface of the gasket exposed to the exhaust gas. And any area that is exposed is compressed tightly. (Assuming a fiber gasket) This is because the fast moving exhaust gas will wear away the fiber if not compressed tightly and exposed to leaks. A steel donut does not have as much issue with wear. However it does not seal as well because it is a hard surface that does not conform to other surfaces. Plus the steel donut and cast iron manifold are dissimilar metal. The issue is if dissimilar metals are exposed to moisture over long periods of time. Like the barn find that has been sitting for decades.

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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Hello everyone, hope you have all been well.

We finally got back on the exhaust manifold yesterday. It's been summertime hot and humid here so it hasn't been getting much driving time.

Once again after the manifold replacement it started leaking the manifold/exhaust connection.

We quickly found out the donut gaskets won't work. There is a small cutout in the manifold but no matching cutout on the exhaust flange. I doubt if it would seat well, plus additional stress would be on the flange ears causing them to bend and slip.

We also discovered the reason for the gaskets to be blowing out all the time. There is an exhust clamp bracket just below where the pipe bolts to the manifold. When this clamp is tightened, it torques the pipe over just a bit, causes the flange/manifold mating surfaces to twist and opens a gap on the outboard side.

Another unpleasant discovery we made was the mechanic at Ford did not use the new manifold studs and hardware I gave them when he replaced the manifold. The mounting studs are obviously old, nuts are worn down on the edges and rusted onto the studs so they come out completely when loosened. Them coming out is actually good thing because the crossmember doesn't allow the pipe to drop down enough to clear them. Since they come out of the manifold the exhaust pipe can be easily slid over.

We ended up not using that clamp, but that means there are no brackets supporting the pipe all the way back to the rear axle area. Probably not a big deal with strong pipe, but we can see there is new pipe from the manifold back to about the middle of the car where it is welded to old rusty pipe to the rear of the car. I didn't see anyplace where we could install a support clamp because the pipe runs right under the driveshaft.

Without using that clamp we were able to tighen it down securely and YAY!! no more old tractor sound. She purrs like new.

Unfortunately a new problem arose after we got the exhaust sealed. Now it's running very hot, up past the 3/4 mark just while idling. Previously it ran just over the 1/4 mark, so something's amiss. We drove it but additional air flow did not bring the gauge down at all. There was a strong odor coming from the manifold junction, we suspect one of the new flange gaskets - we used two - was heating up and releasing fumes. After a while it went away.

Next weekend we'll check o make sure the exhaust flange seal didn't slide out of the way and is partially blocking the exhaust, that should be an easy visual check from under the car. Another possibility is a small animal may have made a nest at the end of the tailpipe and it's blocked. We live in a rural area with plenty of small critters. It's parked outside under a 3-wall carport. It could also be a blocked muffler.

And we'll check the coolant level :) to be sure.

We'll probably take it to a muffler shop regardless to replace the rusted pipe.

Thanks for listening.

Bob
 
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Next weekend we'll check o make sure the exhaust flange seal didn't slide out of the way and is partially blocking the exhaust, that should be an easy visual check from under the car. Another possibility is a small animal may have made a nest at the end of the tailpipe and it's blocked. We live in a rural area with plenty of small critters. It's parked outside under a 3-wall carport. It could also be a blocked muffler.

Bob
There is a test for that.
Once engine is is on curb idle speed with vacuum gauge connected, watch the reading. If it gradually decreases you have an exhaust restriction.

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Thanks Action! That's a good tip. I need to find a good vacuum port on the engine.

It's been a while - is the distributor vac advance port a good spot?

Our son, who is usually very observant, now isn't so sure the temp was running at the 1/4 mark on the way over Saturday. So we're going to pickup a new t-stat and gasket as well. Just in case.....

Bob
 

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It's been a while - is the distributor vac advance port a good spot?.

Bob
No. The vac advance gets venturi vacuum not manifold vacuum.

Have power brakes? That vacuum is from the intake.

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Hmmm - no, don't have power brakes. I seem to remember looking around for a vacuum port many many months ago and not having any luck.

I've check again this weekend.

Thanks,
Bob
 

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Not sure about six bangers as I have only owned one. A 78 Granada that had a 250.
Even if you do not have power brakes, I have to believe that was an option and because of that there is a vacuum connection somewhere that is capped.

Attached is a nice vacuum chart showing lots of diagnostics

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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Thanks for that, looks interesting and the first time I've seen such a chart.

The Falcon did have vacuum wipers before we installed electric, so there's a vacuum connection I blocked off. Should be easy to find.

Bob
 

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That may be from a fuel pump. If yes that won't work.
If it is from the engine, that WILL work.

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Aarrrgggghhhhh - yes, the vacuum wipers were connected to the fuel pump port.

Rats.............
 

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Found a couple interesting things today.

First, our son said as soon as he turned the key to On, the Temp gauge pegged. After he came over to the house the Temp gauge was pegged at the same spot. I disconnected the cable at the Temp Sending Unit and the gauge dropped to zero. I ohmmed the sender post to ground and got about 30 ohms. I have no idea what the correct reading should be, but it sure looks like a bad sending unit to me. Also, it would be the first bad one I've ever seen.

Checked the exhaust, the new gaskets are in secure, nothing blocking the exhaust and the exhaust still sounds nice and quiet, like new. But with the exhaust noise gone, we can now hear a miss in the engine.

Went to Carquest and ordered new Temp Sending Unit, also added Dist Cap and Spark Plugs to the list. They had the Rotor, Points and Condenser in stock.

While the son was out running errands I took the time to check the spark plugs. They were all Rust colored, which the book says is caused by Unleaded Fuel - surporise, surprise. Recently we started using Lead Additive, don't remember for sure the brand but I have him pour about half a bottle in when he fills up. The bottle says it treats 25 gallons and the Falcon has a 14 gallon tank.

I cleaned them up, checked the gap and reinstalled them one at a time. All went well until I got to cylinder 5. That plug was totally collapsed and covered in gunk. Absolutely no way it could spark. I suspect the garage where I had them get it in running condition before we moved from Arizona in 2017 took short cuts and either didn't check them or did a really, really, really bad job. I started to clean it up but then decided to get a new set of Autolite 46 plugs from the local parts store and replace them all now. There was too much debris in there that I didn't want fallinginto the chamber. I'll keep the set I ordered as spares.

After he was done with errands we picked up the spark plugs and I showed him how to gap them and had him replace them one at a time to avoid getting them mixed up.

After he was done we started the car and it ran nice and smooth. The cold idle was too high, adjusted it down. After it warmed up, noticed the warm idle would get stuck high but blipping the pedal would bring it down. Have to check to see if anything is binding. Took it for a drive, ran better than it had for years.

We'll do a tuneup after the rest of the parts arrive and scheduling permits.

Bob
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Those plugs are done.
The bottom two have not been fulling firing. Which is likely your misfire.
If it were me I will pull those new plugs in those positions after a 1000 miles of service and check out what they look like.

In my opinion, the lead addition is doing nothing other than making the profits of the lead additive company increase. Lead was used to increase the octane rating. You have a six and I assume the use of that six is not for racing, high performance driving or pulling heavy loads. If there is no spark knock I would end the lead additive buying. IMO

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