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I don't know how dangerous it is but then I would question the value of a larger front without the rear.
 

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The factory manufactured many cars with bars in the front only.

I have upgraded the front bar on my Mark III with no adverse impact. High speed turns on the Interstate now have less body movement. But that car and all of my cars are not driven faster than the speed limit on any road.

Action
 

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Discussion Starter #43
The factory manufactured many cars with bars in the front only.

I have upgraded the front bar on my Mark III with no adverse impact. High speed turns on the Interstate now have less body movement. But that car and all of my cars are not driven faster than the speed limit on any road.

Action
+1

My '73 Caprice Classic has a factory large front sway bar and originally no rear sway bar and that car is bigger and much heavier than a '65-'68 full size Ford.

Plus I think the GS Mercury Grand Marquis only had front sway bars. The LS series had rears. Our 2004 Mercury Grand Marquis GS doesn't have a rear sway bar but both my old '93 and current '94 LS models did/do.

I'm not advocating that having only one sway bar is correct or OK, just saying it is what it is. ;)

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Power Steering --> Round 2 Continued
Thought I'd continue on with steering gear #2.

Steering2_1.jpg

All the parts cleaned and painted.

I'll go right to the juicy end since I just covered this.

Steering2_2.jpg

This has more play than the first one..... :( Well crap....

You win some and you loose some. But here's my thoughts on all this. But first a simple primer on how these things work for those who may not know. If you do skip this part.

Quick and dirty tutorial:

SteeringGear_15.jpg

This is the control shaft assembly. You can see the input shaft on the right where the steering coupler attaches and the worm gear on the left that moves the piston/rack assembly. There is a torsion spring rod connecting the input shaft to the worm gear. It actually runs inside the input shaft and inside the worm gear. Attached to the torsion spring is a mechanism that either moves the spool valve holder up or down depending on the rotation of the twist on the torsion rod bar. If you have vice grip like hands and have enough arm/hand strength you can hold the worm gear in your left hand and the input shaft in your right and twist in opposite directions. Depending on how much strength and grip you have you can feel the torsion spring/rod in there and probably see the spool valve holder slide up or down the long axis.

Armed with that mental visual, how the power assist works is the power steering pump puts out a controlled flow rate independent of engine RPM. The flow rate enters and exits the steering gear. The spool valve takes the input pressure and applies it to both side of the piston/rack if there is no twist on the torsion rod (no steering wheel input). When you want to steer the car, this is what happens. First when you move the steering wheel, you are trying to spin the worm through the torsion rod via the input shaft. The worm tries to move the rack through the ball bearings that recirculate. This produces resistance because the rack is ultimately directly connected to the tyres via the Pitman shaft, Pitman arm and steering linkages (tie rods and such). In other words for a tiny movement of the steering wheel you are trying to move the wheels manually as if there was no power steering. This resistance causes the torsion rod to twist and the spool valve to move in the appropriate direction that starts cutting off return fluid to the pump, thus raising pressure, whilst simultaneously applying that pressure to the side of the piston that will move the rack in the direction you're turning.

So really the power assist works off of the torque differential between the worm gear and the input shaft. The greater the amount of twist (more torque) the more the spool valve moves and the more hydraulic pressure or assist you receive. I hope I explained that well enough, if so cool beans we're both on the same page. The extra play that arises comes from a worn worm, worn rack or worn balls, or all the above. Since the power assist only reacts to the amount of twist in the torsion rod, any play in the worm to rack interface doesn't start to load the torsion rod until that play is taken up. If you have 7 degrees of play before the torsion rod engages that will translate to linear amount of circumference steering wheel travel (depends on the diameter of steering wheel) that effectively does absolutely nothing.

Now we were looking at it from the input shaft side, lets consider what happens from the output side of the steering gear. Say you're holding steering wheel firm or locked trying to drive in a straight line. Now the wheels hit a pot hole or a groove in the road and that tries to force the wheels to turn. That force is translated up through the steering tie rods and such through Pitman Arm into the Pitman shaft and into the rack/piston. That rack will move and spin the worm gear, but you're holding the input shaft (steering wheel) from turning. The torsion rod will start to twist and apply hydraulic pressure which will keep the rack from moving any further and prevent the wheels from following the grooves in the road or a sudden steering event from a pothole.

You can imagine if there is indeed play in the rack to worm gear interface, the wheels are allowed to move a little bit more before the hydraulic system corrects that. So the car will have more of a propensity to wander and of course wider tyres will tram more exacerbating the effect.

How to fix this.....

That's another whole ball of sticky wax. There are no replacement parts at all I can find for this. You have a few choices, some unpleasant; find another steering gear and hope for the best, have a machine shop measure/scan the rack and worm then CNC new pieces then heat treat. That route I'd estimate 2-3 grand for a one-up set. Or if the wear is strictly in the rack and uniform try a bearing manufacturer to see if you could get steel balls in a couple thousandths oversize and see if that eliminates the play.

No matter what you do it's time consuming and pricy.

The problem with finding another steering gear is also wear and then, even finding another steering gear. 1965-1968 are the same and they are all old. I have a theory that the wear problem stems from oil break down due to heat. How many people ever change the power steering fluid? Yuppers not many. Ford uses ATF for power steering and ATF breaks down with heat rather easily. The 3rd gen Fords and some of the 4th gens use Ford-Thompson pumps. Ford Thomspon pumps seem to have a high regulated flow rate. These are the old round P.S. pumps with a metal shell for a reservoir. The high flow rate generates more heat, as a result I have found through looking at these cars every 3rd gen Ford with factory air seems to have come with a power steering cooler, or at least the big block cars did. This latest power steering gear I rebuilt that has even more slop than the first one (and has 1/4 less miles than the first gear I did), came from a car that had dealer installed air but no cooler. The oil was black/brown. This supports that theory, but with a small case sample size it could be coincidence.

With all that said, for now I will run with the first steering gear I did and is already installed on the frame. Granted I'm being picky, the play in this one may not even be noticeable as I do not plan on wide tyres, it will be either 225 or 235 all the way round.

To complete the front end of the chassis I put on some crappy tyres and rims for now. Time to focus on the rear axle and its disc brakes.

Steering2_5.jpg

Cheers
 

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To drag the sway bar topic out further. Regarding the Lincoln Mark Series vehicles which were modified Thunderbird vehicles......

The Mark III was introduced for the 1969 model year using the Thunderbird platform. This model was built until model year 1971. Only a front sway bar was installed. (No rear bar)

The Mark IV for model years 1973 & 1974 had a rear bar that was 5/8" in diameter, in addition to a front bar.

The Mark IV for model year 1975 & 1976 had a rear bar that was 3/4" in diameter, in addition to a front bar.

I assume the away bars were hollow. Only because the front say bar on my 1970 Mark III was hollow. The replacement front sway bar I used was solid. The maker was Addco and I am pretty sure I got it from Summit. Using my memory, that was about 5 years ago.

I have been thinking about getting a rear bar for a Mark IV and adaption to my Mark III.

>>>>>>>>>>Action
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Hello Action,

Thank you for the Lincoln sway bar information. I've never owned a Lincoln, but I do love a Mark V. Drove one for a week..... beautiful.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Differential

Time to start on assembly.

XLGears_01.jpg

I ran a flat file over the new differential and the old ring gear to remove any burrs. Next I pressed on the carrier bearings.

XLGears_03.jpg

XLGears_04.jpg

I had to get creative whilst not damaging the parts to push the bearing past the differential nose sticking up.

The ring gear can go on next.

XLGears_05.jpg

If you don't have a decent book on Ford rear axles, I have to suggest this book. It's full of good information.

Now the ring gear should be snug over the differential, but this one was tight. I ran a file on the inside diameter to remove any burrs to no avail. I ended up sanding the ID of the ring gear and test fitting numerous times till it finally felt snug without needing a press to get it on. What should have taken 15 minutes to install took over 2 hours. I see why people go mad and abandon car projects.

Also chase the threads for the ring gear and bolts, use Locktite and torque down evenly. Now to hold the differential I used one of the brand new axle shafts.

XLGears_02.jpg

The new Moser 31 spline 1541h alloy shafts arrived.

XLGears_06.jpg

I have aluminum jaw protectors installed and holding the shaft which holds the differential enough to torque down the ring gear bolts.

On a side note sorry for the weird lighting pictures. I had recently replaced the fluorescent's over the bench with soft white LED's retrofit bulbs and whilst it's easier on the eyes, it plays havoc with the camera, especially when there is cool white (blueish) fluorescent's in the main roof of the building. The white balance is set to auto but it's all over the place and the pictures end up funky.

XLGears_08.jpg

I forgot that the new Summit nodular iron cases have a snap ring to hold in the pinion snout bearing. Didn't need stock retainer after all.

XLGears_09.jpg


Installed.

XLGears_10.jpg

A couple things here. First before you remove the end caps mark them so they go on the correct side. I just take a small punch and dot the base and bearing cap (left hand side you can see a dimple on the bottom and on the cap).

The last thing, on these Summit cases, remove that small bolt that secures the lock for the bearing adjuster and toss it right in the rubbish bin. It's garbage. It's so soft you cannot even torque them down to the 20 ft lbs without stripping out the head. They are too soft. Obtain some proper fasteners.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Differential Continued

XLGears_11.jpg

I made a quick and dirty holder a few years ago. It's a pain to hold up the third member and bolt on by yourself, but once it's on, it works well enough.

Right, onto the pinion support.

XLGears_12.jpg

New races to be installed.

XLGears_13.jpg

Next press on the inner bearing to the pinion.

XLGears_14.jpg

Ok, this looks funky. What I need to do is install this pinion support without shims and adjust the ring gear close to binding and see if the pinion is going to hit the differential carrier. Now Eaton says their carrier will only work on 3.25:1 and higher ratios. However I came across other references that say it may work without machining or at the very worst I'll have to trim a little off the face of the pinion.

With that I didn't want to waste a crush sleeve or fully install the new nut. So I contrived this hideous thing to do a basic preload whilst checking clearances.

XLGears_15.jpg

For once I lucked out, about 1/4 of clearance under worst case conditions. No machining necessary, these 3.00 gears will work with the Eaton Truetrac. :)

Now I can properly assemble the pinion support.

XLGears_16.jpg

Remove the hideous thing I had on there, the outer bearing and install the crush sleeve.

XLGears_17.jpg

Installed the outer bearing and the new oil slinger.

XLGears_18.jpg

Installed new oil seal. Now I do use a little swipe of RTV on the skirt of the seal to help seal on an old used housing.

Now for the yoke.

XLGears_19.jpg

The seal had worn a deep groove into the yoke so it needed a sleeve.

XLGears_20.jpg

The original 28 spline axle shafts have a similar deep groove and can't be saved. Another reason to make the upgrade to 31 spline.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Differential Continued
Here's something of possible interest.

XLGears_21.jpg

It would seem that there are two size yokes used on the Ford full size cars. From what I've observed the 65-66 Fords with 352 or smaller engines came with the small bearing Ford 9" and also the smaller yoke that only accepts 1310 series Cardan joints. The 390 and larger engine cars received the large bearing Ford 9" axle and larger yoke for the larger stronger 1330 series Cardan joints.

Now I know Ford discontinued the small bearing Ford 9" at least for the full size cars in 1967 and instead offered that WER Salisbury type (8.8 predecessor) and I do believe those also have the smaller yoke.

Just something to keep in mind when replacing an axle or upgrading one.

XLGears_22.jpg

New sleeve installed. I also used Locktite to seal and hold. This can be assembled onto the pinion and tightened with the new crimp nut with sealant.

XLGears_23.jpg

The pinion support is finished now to sort out some shims. I bought another assortment pack, but since nothing is marked, I spent some time and measured and wrote on them in thousandths their value. The ones atop the package are what came in that kit.

XLGears_24.jpg

Now since it's new case I decided to try the middle of road and go from there. So I chose the 0.015" shim and loaded it onto the pinion support.

But before we can tighten down the pinion support into the third member case, I have to get the timing marks lined up.

XLGears_25.jpg

I put a dab of yellow paint on the pinion and ring gear to make it easier to see the original marks when they were machined all those decades ago.

XLGears_26.jpg

The books says to aim for 0.010" on backlash with used gears. Okie Dokie.

XLGears_27.jpg


The mesh pattern on the drive side is too close to the heel (inboard) and high up.

XLGears_28.jpg


It's hard to see but the mesh is too close to the toe (outboard). So I need to increase the distance of the pinion. (The book covers this well). I'll bump this to 0.019".

XLGears_29.jpg


I think we are there, at least on the drive side.

XLGears_30.jpg

It's hard to tell, but the pattern on the coast side is a little high but closer to the centre. From experience on the 1966 LTD's rear axle in resetting the gear mesh, this is about the best you can do on these used old Ford gears.

I spent several hours on the LTD's gears as that was the first one I had done. There is a little art involved with this as well. You have to apply a decent holding force on the ring gear when messing in the goo to make a pattern. The pattern may seem to shift a bit on depending on the holding force, so use several teeth and take the average. Or at least that works for me.

Now I can't get the coast side on centre like the drive side, but is that from used gears or 1960's American auto industries "That'll do" indifference to quality. I was able to get a good pattern centre'd on the coast and drive side of a very similar setup on my Caprice Classic I installed the Ford 9" into. But those were brand new Richmond gears at 350 dollar a set. Just dunno.

So this is done, I need to wipe off the anti-seize and install the pinion support O-ring along with the support hood for the bumper stop.

Until next time.

Cheers
 

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you did well with that nasty job. weld a tube onto your pumpkin holder so you can use it with the engine stand
 

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The factory manufactured many cars with bars in the front only.

I have upgraded the front bar on my Mark III with no adverse impact. High speed turns on the Interstate now have less body movement. But that car and all of my cars are not driven faster than the speed limit on any road.

Action
Probably most old cars only had front bars, as in my 70, as they were designed that way. I expect that all of us do not push our vehicles to the limit of the design, or handling capabilities. Maybe the Addco guys recommend upgrading the rear, along with the front, so they can sell us two bars, instead of just one. :rolleyes:;) To me, keeping the balance, maintaining vehicle dynamics make sense, but I'll have to wait until I can find parts I can afford.:(

Addco FAQ:
9. If I add a front anti-sway bar, do I need to add one to the rear?

We highly recommend that you upgrade them in sets. When you stiffen one end of the car, it changes the handling characteristics of the vehicle which can have undesirable effects by shifting the balance of traction away from that axle.
 

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Design, theory and actual applications.

For my Mark III which has nearly every option (and more weight) it tips the scales at just shy of 5000 pounds. Add a passenger or 3 and the total load is over that amount easily. With the weight bias definitely in the front!

On the interstate the ride can be stated as boatish. With lane changes and high speed cornering on the interstate body movement is very noticable. (Body roll) The stock front sway bar is hollow and if memory serves me is about 5/8" in diameter.

In an effort to bring the body movement under greater control I decided to install a stiffer bar up front. I believe I went to a 3/4" solid bar and the least expensive vendor happened to be Addco. Bigger diameter bars were available. But too much of a good thing can be too much. There was a noticeable change in the ride for the better. At least in my opinion.

For rear coil spring applications (and the Mark III fits that design) I would agree a rear bar could be an additional help. The rear bar doesn't have to be as stiff for this application for two reasons. It is a solid rear axle. And most of the body weight is up front.

IMO, for rear leaf spring application a rear bar would almost be a waste of effort. The leaf spring has 4 attachment points versus 2 for coil springs. Making it more difficult for one side to squat as the load is spread out. And the leaves inhibit the body movement as well.

Then there are rear coils on rear independent suspension. This suspension can move much more because nothing is connected from side to side. A rear bar is nearly mandatory in that application. My Lincoln Navigator with independent rear suspension is set up like this with a nice big rear bar. (In addition to the front bar)

>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
 

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Great discussion. I think that vehicles with IRS, and newer vehicles, have much more rigid chassis and body structure. Our old cars have a lot of chassis flex and the energy of road impacts is dissipated though the flexing of the chassis, as well as the springs and dampers. A stiff chassis requires the suspension to do all of the work and be more compliant. The anti-roll, or anti-sway bar is designed to share spring rate with the other side, so you can have a more compliant spring and a system that can share the load when necessary with the other side. I imagine a modern car would ride like a lumber wagon with springs stiff enough to be without an anti-sway bar.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Rear Axle and Rear Disc Brakes
I had a spot of bother with the rear disc brakes adaption. The rear disc brakes I want to install are the Ford Explorer type brakes because of the large bearing diameter. It's the same size bearing hole as the big bearing 9". However the Explorer disc brakes only work on large bearing diameter Ford 9" axles with the "New Style" bolt pattern aka "Torino Style" bolt pattern.

axleflangechart.png

Here's a chart I nicked off the internet. I naturally looked at this then at the axle.

Axle_1-1.jpg

Well I jumped the gun and immediately thought I had the "New Style" end because of the flange shape.

Ummmmmmm no.

It has the flange of the "New Style" but the bolt hole pattern of "Old Style". I found out the hard way.....

Axle_01.jpg


Well crap.... (actually other things were said, but you get the idea) :)

This must be some intermediate axle year thing. Figures.....

With that, I had the idea of heating the cast iron backing plate, plug welding the holes closed, then let them cool slowly in the oven. Then mount each backing plate on the mill and using the DRO (digital read out) find centre and then map out the correct "Old Style" holes and drill them into the backing plate so they match the axle perfectly.

But first a note on these Explorer type backing plates.

Axle_02.jpg

These are aftermarket units and not Ford units as Ford discontinued them. I bought these from East Coast Gear for 9o dollars per side. There is a R and L. You can buy the rotors and calipers from Rock Auto. I like these because of the parking brake drum inside the rotor hat. Yes you can buy a generic disc brake kit for the "Old Style" bolt hole pattern but you are stuck using GM calipers with the parking brake lever built into the caliper itself. I am not a fan of those.

OK back to the weld, fill, bake and drill attempt.

In a nutshell it didn't work out so well.

Axle_03.jpg

It turns out I spent too much time on the welding of the holes and couldn't get the backing plates back in the oven fast enough. So the first two holes I filled cooled too quickly and hardened. The last two holes were ok. My oven just didn't go high enough to sustain a long period outside before a controlled cool down. So only two holes drilled normal and the other two spots immediately dulled any drill bit.

Rats....

OK, plan B.

That is to fill the holes in the axle flange and re-drill those. But I would need to order another round of Explorer type backing plates and make an accurate jig that would precisely locate the drill holes.

Axle_05.jpg

Plug welding the steel flange was easy. Just loaded up Er80 in the gas MIG and filled the old drill holes in the flange.

Now for the jig. I had to have a think about this one. This is what I came up with.

Axle_06.jpg


This is the bearing insert side. The round disc simulates the bearing OD.

Axle_07.jpg


On the other side are the drill guides for the holes. I was able to get the hole placement and bearing diameter plate within 1 thousandth. (used the mill with the DRO)

Axle_08.jpg

So the idea here is to place the round disc side in the axle that locates centre precisely and then clock the jig to where it's needed, clamp it to the flange and then drill away.

Then I did a little housekeeping on the axle housing.

Axle_04.jpg

Ford puts those little brake line holder tabs on the axle and I don't care for those. So those came off to make room for a little threaded block that is welded on where a stainless clamp and bolt can reside.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Rear Axle and Rear Disc Brakes Continued

Axle_10.jpg

These are the little blocks I welded on.

Axle_11.jpg

I also added a lower magnetic drain plug. Seems pretty silly to remove the propshaft, pull the axle shafts, remove the brake line and finally remove a ridiculously heavy third member to change the oil. Then put it all back together.

Yuppers drain plug... much easier. :)

Axle_09.jpg

The last thing I did was tap the vent hole for 1/8" NPT. Ford uses a press in deal and it's kind of cheesy. The original vent has a small hole to prevent the ingress of water and such into the axle. You can buy an 1/8"NPT fitting with a similar small hole from Aircraft Spruce. It's for the oil gauge on reciprocating aircraft engines. The tiny hole ensures the gauge will work, but should the gauge or the line rupture it doesn't drain the engine of oil quickly into the cabin and subsequently having you soil yourself wondering where you're going to put down an airplane with a seized engine. :)

Axle_12.jpg


POR 15

Even with nothing in the housing, it's pretty darn heavy. The rack is not happy holding it.

Axle_13.jpg

After hours of fighting springs, and fresh bushings it's finally installed. This was really a pain, I didn't struggle at all with the rear springs in the '66 LTD when I put it's rear axle and suspension back in. I'll have to look in the master parts book (well CD) and see if the XL springs have a higher spring rate or other such notable aspect.

I ended up putting a stool under the rear axle housing and lowering the chassis onto the stool, then I climbed atop the frame to compress the springs enough to get the shock bolts in.

It wasn't a pretty sight, but it's done.

Axle_14.jpg

Next was to set up the rear axle housing for the jig to drill the backing plate holes.

Axle_15.jpg


I put an inclinometer on the frame rail and zero'd it.

Axle_16.jpg

Then I adjusted the housing for a 2.5˚ angle to get in the ball park of the engine/trans centre line sitting on their mounts. I will say it is VERY nice Ford gives you an adjustable upper arm mount to change pinion angle. It's a very nice touch.

Axle_17.jpg

I placed the axle bearing about 2/3's of the way in to act a good guide for the backing plates to see where they might be optimally clocked in place.

Axle_18.jpg

It turns out standard position will work best.

Continued in next post
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Rear Axle and Rear Disc Brakes Continued

Axle_19.jpg

The parking brake cable mount is at a good angle. I intend to use the factory '66 parking brake cables but will have to modify the ends to work with the Ford Explorer type backing plate.

So the next bit will be to drill the holes for the backing plates and install the 3rd member. Then there is still a whole myriad of other details to sort out regarding these brakes.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Rear Axle and Disc Brakes Continued

Some more progress today.

Axle1_01.jpg

I leveled the jig to the flange and triple checked everything.

Axle1_02.jpg

I bought a brand new split point 3/8" bit for this, glad I did as it was a chore to plug a 3/8" hole through the flange.

Axle1_03.jpg

The little pilot portion really aides in drilling.

Axle1_05.jpg

The holes are very snug for the 3/8" Tee bolts, there is no wiggle room.

Axle1_04.jpg

However the new Torino/New Style axle bearing retainer plates fit like a glove.

Axle1_06.jpg


Same deal on the other side.

Axle1_07.jpg

Similar results. This jig will come in handy in the future as my 1968 XL fastback also sports factory disc brakes which are the same that were on the '68 LTD which are now on this chassis. My '68 XL also has this axle and it should be a whole lot easier to convert it to rear disc with the jig. If in the future I want to convert the '66 LTD I can use it as it also has this axle.

That little jig just saved me 800 dollars in buying new axle housing bearing ends and the alignment jig to weld on your own ends.

Axle1_08.jpg

Next is to install the 3rd member/centre section.

Axle1_09.jpg


Holy crap. I never want to try and lift that into position ever again. That was stupid. It took everything I had and I still had to borrow from next week to get it in there. I should have done it like I did on the '66 LTD. I brought the 3rd member over to the power winch in the ceiling and then lifted it up and placed the empty axle housing underneath and let the winch take the weight and I just guided it into position. Then I installed the whole deal into the chassis.

Much easier on the back.

Axle1_10.jpg

So now comes more experimentation. I need to figure out the depth of shim needed between the axle shaft and the bearing to make sure the axle itself does not rub on the parking brake components and also determine if the rotor, pads and caliper I have will work on a parts stack up.

I did some quick research and there are a few different rotors and calipers for this type of rear Ford brake. There is early and mid Panther and Explorer. I think they'll all bolt in place, however there are small subtle differences in the dimensions and placements.

I pillaged used rotors and calipers off a '97 Panther and I have new pads. I will test fit those first and play with spacers on the axle shaft to see if those components will play nicely together on this Explorer backing plate.

In order to facilitate this I installed a plastic faux bearing in lieu of the real bearing. It's ABS and 3D printed. This allows me to slide the new axle shafts in place and experiment with shims and such.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
Rear Axle and Disc Brakes Continued

Axle1_11.jpg

I have to admit it is neat to see a Panther style rear disc brake on this old crock :)

Axle1_12.jpg

This is the bearing to plate spacer that is needed to take up the space of the thicker disc brake backing plate versus the drum backing plate. I ordered these from Moser when I bought the new 31 spline 1541h alloy axle shafts.

Axle1_13.jpg

So for now I have that spacer installed and the axle bearing retainer plate snugged in.

Once I figure out the shim, rotor and caliper next will be finding an OEM hydraulic caliper hose that best fits this application and run stainless lines to the main hose atop the axle housing.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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In my dreams I see this work. A better than new full sized Ford. With new tires crunching on gravel in a slow speed turn with zero sounds from the power steering. Engine running and barely audible.

OK I wok up. That third member isn't light. In high schools I muscled one into a '64 Galaxie out on the street on my back with the rear of the vehicle on jack stands.

>>>>>Action
 

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Discussion Starter #60 (Edited)
Rear Axle and Disc Brakes Continued
Onward with a little more progress.

Axle-Brakes_01.jpg

I was experimenting with some differing thickness spacers when the Moser spacers arrived in the post. Turns out these Moser 3/16" thick spacers are perfect for the job. I should point this out. No one (and by non-one I mean the common manufacturers of axle shafts) has the 3rd gen full size Fords axle shaft lengths on file, so I measured carefully the old 28 spline axles, filled out the form and had these made exactly as the originals just 31 spline and 1541h alloy.

Axle-Brakes_02.jpg

You can see I'm using the faux plastic (ABS) 3D printed bearing as a mock piece to check the parts stack up. I can just slide the axle shaft in with no pressing required.

Axle-Brakes_03.jpg

So far so good. No more rubbing on the parking brake springs.

Axle-Brakes_05.jpg

Axle-Brakes_06.jpg

The rotor is darn near perfectly placed in the centre of the caliper slide area.

Axle-Brakes_07.jpg

I temporarily installed the caliper and new pads to check fitment.

Axle-Brakes_08.jpg

Everything fit beautifully. The rotor and caliper are from a '97 Panther. I had a check on RockAuto and the application range is from 1996-2002.

Bloody hell, we have factory style Ford rear disc brakes on a large bearing originally 'Old Style' flange 9". :) It was a long road.

Axle-Brakes_09.jpg


However we are not out of the woods yet. The hydraulic hose to caliper has yet to be determined. The shock bracket is really close.

Armed with all this visual evidence, I ordered new seal kits for the calipers (will rebuild these and powder coat), new hardware, new rotors (they are so cheap it's not even worth having these cut), and a couple of rear brake hoses that I thought might work based off the pictures (thank you RockAuto for posting detailed pictures and specs).

Onto pressing the axle shafts together with shims and real bearings now.

Continued in next post.
 
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