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The base part number for a Ford fan is 8600
The base part number for a Ford shroud is 8146
The fan center hole diameter with a clutch is 2 3/8 inches.
The fan center hole diameter without a clutch is 5/8 inches

Ford 1967 full sized Ford there are two radiators.
One is 19 3/4 inches wide
The other is 23 1/4 inches wide
For a reference the FE block had 3 radiators that were 23 inches and change wide

The stock 1967 full sized Ford with a 289 engine never had a fan clutch.
Other years did, just not 67.

Action
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Regarding Ford part numbers, what you have pòste above is not a part number that you would find in the parts catalog. It is a number found ON the part. For the most of the time Ford does not ut part service numbers on parts. That number is an engineering number.

See post 6 in this thread 65 Falcon Futura No Spark | Ford Automobiles (fordforumsonline.com)

Regarding fan blade damage. Any damage should be a hard NO WAY. Especially cracks. That is the beginning of a blade going through your radiator or worse.

Action
Yeah Thanks Action, yeah that;s a good thread. I'll jsut keep looking for the right Fan and Shroud, if I come across one I may run it by you and DesertXL, if that;s OK thanks :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Howdy,

That high performance fan is too small in diameter, the factory HVAC fan is 19" and change in diameter. I wouldn't use that fan I sent the link on, rather use it as a pictorial guide to a better example. However that is the price I would expect to pay for a serviceable one. None of these old Ford parts are cheap anymore. These cars are worth far more in pieces than as a whole. What a used fan blade and a shroud is going to cost is basically what I paid for the last parts car I bought (68 LTD). That's the other sucky reality with an old full size Ford.

Now the fun begins finding serviceable parts. :)

Cheers
Hi Desert,
Thanks for the valuable info. I'll keep looking around for the right fan, so the part number should be C5AZ-8600-B - I agree with you, I don't mind paying that for a serviceable one, but as you say, that one is beat up. So this one is correct then? 65-68 FAN - should be 19" and change?
When I find one and shroud, I may run it past you guys if that Ok please?

Thanks
Kind Regards
Larry M
 

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Larry,
Amidst the configuration and searching of new parts, a few things on DesertXL's post #13 on the first page require minimal wrenching. In one of your radiator photos, did I see 'flecks' of some sort on the fluid? If you've dealt with at least some of the recommendatons (e.g., clean coolant flow through ALL passages, confirming it's not an instrumenation issue) or they've been further addressed in this thread .. just ignore me.😶

2 cents; keep the change.
Kevin
 
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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Larry,
Amidst the configuration and searching of new parts, a few things on DesertXL's post #13 on the first page of this thread can be require minimal wrenching. In one of your radiator photos, did I see 'flecks' of some sort on the fluid? If you've dealt with at least some of the recommendatons (e.g., clean coolant flow through ALL passages, confirming it's not an instrumenation issue) or they've been further addressed in this thread .. just ignore me.😶

2 cents; keep the change.
Kevin
Hi Kevin,
Yes your right, there were some minor flecks, I think that could be just some deposit that has come off the radiator perhaps, but overall, its pretty well much all green :)
thanks
LArry M
 

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Key to me is the "soft lower radiator hose." Having owned mulitple Fords of the 60s and 70s variety (6 or so) I, too, had a baffling overheating problem. Like you, I had a soft lower hose that collapsed while out on the road driving. It didn't happen immediately - low speeds did not provide total collapse, so engine was not in overheat mode. Above avg heat was likely, but undetected with "idiot lights" vs guages. Once speed picked up, gradual heat build started (air flow made buildup slow - 200 cid inline 6) and would worsen as I would slow toward home with low surface flow over block. Yes, it would eventually dissipate as hose maintained shape and allowed much better fluid flow.

Like you, I agonized over all the possibilities. But advice from my Dad was best: When you can't be sure, start with the cheapest items first. I changed belts - nothing; then I changed hoses - voila! No more overheating. I was amazed at the difference in hose stiffness between the OEM replacement hose and the aftermarket hose that was on the return (bottom radiator hose). If you can easily crush the hose to a point where the hose walls touch each other it would be my first step in what may be multiple steps to eliminating your issue.

BTW ... my issue has been fuel vapor lock on 65 Galaxie convertible FE 352 4v. Replacing the old log exhaust manifolds with Hooker long tube headers made it run MUCH better (along with alum intake and match carb) ... until returning to slower traffic conditions after running on interstate. Aluminum transfers heat faster than cast iron from the top of the engine. Too, headers emit an insane amount of heat that the old cast iron manifolds used to insulate. End result was fuel boil, particularly with 10% ethanol. So, quick runs to the grocery meant dead vehicle for longer stretch until I put the factors on the table, then verified the result. ALOT of heat builds up under a Galaxie hood that has little to no clearance over air filter housing. Dual snorkel cold air intake has vastly diminished that problem AND I buy ethanol free high test which is the right combination to eliminate the issue.

You will become adept at problem resolution, cause/effect analysis, particularly as old cars were designed in a different environment. Your overheating issues are a foundation for learning - and you will - and you will conquer and derive pleasure in your growing ability as a classic car sleuth.
 

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Many lower radiator hoses have a metal coiled wire inside them to keep the lower radiator hose expanded when the water pump is sucking the coolant out of that hose. Especially at higher RPM. Most of the time that coiled wire can be felt without removing the hose. Just squeeze.

I have kept a few of those coiled wires on replaced hoses to use in any newer lower radiator hose that does not have one of those. Have never really had an overheat condition on a well maintained vehicle. But the coiled wire does not hurt anything being in there.

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Hi Kevin,
Yes your right, there were some minor flecks, I think that could be just some deposit that has come off the radiator perhaps, but overall, its pretty well much all green :)
thanks
LArry M
DesertXL and everyone,
One last question please, when I replace the Thermostat, should I drill a hole
No shroud over the fan that’s not good I made a custom one
Thanks,
No shroud over the fan that’s not good I made a custom one
Thanks Hanson,
Yes I may have to resort to that, indeed. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Key to me is the "soft lower radiator hose." Having owned mulitple Fords of the 60s and 70s variety (6 or so) I, too, had a baffling overheating problem. Like you, I had a soft lower hose that collapsed while out on the road driving. It didn't happen immediately - low speeds did not provide total collapse, so engine was not in overheat mode. Above avg heat was likely, but undetected with "idiot lights" vs guages. Once speed picked up, gradual heat build started (air flow made buildup slow - 200 cid inline 6) and would worsen as I would slow toward home with low surface flow over block. Yes, it would eventually dissipate as hose maintained shape and allowed much better fluid flow.

Like you, I agonized over all the possibilities. But advice from my Dad was best: When you can't be sure, start with the cheapest items first. I changed belts - nothing; then I changed hoses - voila! No more overheating. I was amazed at the difference in hose stiffness between the OEM replacement hose and the aftermarket hose that was on the return (bottom radiator hose). If you can easily crush the hose to a point where the hose walls touch each other it would be my first step in what may be multiple steps to eliminating your issue.

BTW ... my issue has been fuel vapor lock on 65 Galaxie convertible FE 352 4v. Replacing the old log exhaust manifolds with Hooker long tube headers made it run MUCH better (along with alum intake and match carb) ... until returning to slower traffic conditions after running on interstate. Aluminum transfers heat faster than cast iron from the top of the engine. Too, headers emit an insane amount of heat that the old cast iron manifolds used to insulate. End result was fuel boil, particularly with 10% ethanol. So, quick runs to the grocery meant dead vehicle for longer stretch until I put the factors on the table, then verified the result. ALOT of heat builds up under a Galaxie hood that has little to no clearance over air filter housing. Dual snorkel cold air intake has vastly diminished that problem AND I buy ethanol free high test which is the right combination to eliminate the issue.

You will become adept at problem resolution, cause/effect analysis, particularly as old cars were designed in a different environment. Your overheating issues are a foundation for learning - and you will - and you will conquer and derive pleasure in your growing ability as a classic car sleuth.
Thanks Barry and Action, yes I guess I could start with the lower bottom hose, so I have to get an OEM hose, correct?
BTW, when the car has reached its normal running temperature, the bottom and top hoses should be the same temp if you touch them, correct? If one is cold and the other hot, then the coolant isn't circulating would that be correct?
Thanks
Larry M
 

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Thanks Barry and Action, yes I guess I could start with the lower bottom hose, so I have to get an OEM hose, correct?
BTW, when the car has reached its normal running temperature, the bottom and top hoses should be the same temp if you touch them, correct?
If one is cold and the other hot, then the coolant isn't circulating would that be correct?
Thanks
Larry M
Do not drill a hole in the thermostat! There will be one in it. Orient that hole towards the top if the T-stat is mounted vertically

When the engine has reached operating temperature hopefully the hoses are NOT the same temperature.
By design, hot coolant coming out of the engine enters the top of the radiator via the upper radiator hose.
Heat in the coolant is supposed to be released when the coolant moves to the bottom of the radiator. That is the whole purpose of the radiator is to remove heat from the coolant and release it to outside air from the radiator as air blows through the radiator.
The lower radiator hose should be measurebly cooler than the upper radiator hose.

If you can feel a wire inside of the lower radiator hose (with engine off) that hose would not be able to collapse. The wire is holding the hose open

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Larry,
An earlier post of mine listed an example of a 20ish degree (F) difference between the upper and lower hoses.

Here is a good example of a thermostat with the 'jiggle pin' referenced by Action, positioned at 12 O'clock when installed.
Gates 3039S Thermostat at RockAuto (click to the third image)
If you pull the incumbent part merely to inspect, you'll need a new gasket.
Kevin
 
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Thanks Kevin, sorry for the delay. Yes, I 've ordered some Gates Thermostats, but the have no jigle valve. Hopefully it will be ok
Thanks Larry
Hi larrymury1961,

The little check valve is not important on a thermostat. When you're filling the radiator back up with coolant after changing it just remove the heater hose from the intake and slowly fill till you see coolant at the top of the heater hose nipple. Reinstall the heater hose and fill back up to normal. That should have "burped it" enough to get most of the air trapped in the top of the engine out. The rest will purge when the thermostat opens for the first time. After the car cools back down top off the radiator to the maximum mark whilst still allowing for normal expansion area.

Cheers
 

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Hi larrymury1961,

The little check valve is not important on a thermostat. When you're filling the radiator back up with coolant after changing it just remove the heater hose from the intake and slowly fill till you see coolant at the top of the heater hose nipple. Reinstall the heater hose and fill back up to normal. That should have "burped it" enough to get most of the air trapped in the top of the engine out. The rest will purge when the thermostat opens for the first time. After the car cools back down top off the radiator to the maximum mark whilst still allowing for normal expansion area.

Cheers
Thanks Kevin will do, I replace thermostat when they arrive from Rock auto. I wasn't going to touch the radiator and coolant etc, just change the thermostat. Do I need to top it up again?
Thanks Larry:)
 

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At least SOME coolant will drain and need to be replaced.

My practice is to drain at least enough to prevent a significant amount of coolant spilling from the intake manifold and down the front of the engine before pulling a thermostat housing; sort of a mess (ask me how I know LOL., thogh been too long since I last did one to have a feel for the quantity).

Assuming you can drain the coolant into a clean pan and it still looks clean and greenish you can pour it back into the radiator after closing the pitcock and secucring up the thermostat. Based on the photo you posted it doesn't look like it'll be that hard to open. A decent funnel helps, though I remember my job 50 years ago seeing my boss steadily pouring coolant into the radiator opening without a funnel and without spilling. I'm far too clumsy to try it.

After running it to temp with no leaks you might need a bit of top up if some spilled to unwanted places.

Another 2 cents, keep the change
Kevin
 
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