Ford Automobiles banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know how to disconnect the 20 pin connector on the main control cover of a 6F35 transmission?

In this case, it's a 2013 Ford Fusion S model.

Here are some pictures, along with a picture from Motorcraft's connector catalog that looks like a very similar locking mechanism:





 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
Welcome to the FFO!

I have not had the opportunity to remove a connector like that.
Not sure I totally understand the pictures.

>>>>Action
 

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
Many of the modern connector for electronics are click type up to a half a dozen wires. The old 60 pin PCM used to be a single connector that had a bolt.

Most recently the connectors to the PCM are split into fewer wire counts with a lever action engagement. (See attached pictures) This is to accommodate a 190 pin count split into 3 groups. Transmission, body and engine. Since the designers of the harness would be the same engineer, the other end of the transmission connector may be similar with a lever engagement.

Kind of guessing here.

>>>>>>>Action

Text Technology Auto part Electronic device Parallel
Line art Monochrome Coloring book Black-and-white Parallel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Action, thanks for welcoming me and providing the information.

When I looked closer at the connector, I noticed it said DELPHI and then what appeared to be three letters (MST) and then a 4 character alphanumeric sequence (DF20)



Considering it's a Ford, the Delphi connector made no sense to me at first. I then learned that Ford and GM created a partnership in 2002 to create the 6F transmission family, so the GM part in a Ford transmission made sense.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM-Ford_6-speed_automatic_transmission

When I first looked for the connector types in Ford part supplier Motorcraft's catalog, I found something that looked exactly like the connector in the car and the service manual. It was the picture I posted in my first post and can be found on page 38 of the PDF:

https://www.fordservicecontent.com/pubs/content/connectors/images/connectorcatalog.pdf

As I browse a similar catalog for Delphi connector parts, it seems that it is a lever lock per the similar design on page 52. There are also tools listed for Delphi connectors starting on page 330 that make me wonder if I need something to insert into the plastic connector to unlock the lever that won't budge upwards.

https://www.reynoldsonline.com/ASSETS/DOCUMENTS/ITEMS/EN/POSI12124580L_Broc.pdf

If anyone knows about these kinds of connectors or can help me brainstorm on it, please help.

Thanks,

Eric
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
Delphi is a stand alone auto support vendor. Supplies parts as a vendor. I believe once upon a time it was owned by GM. That would have been pre-GM bankruptcy. There are a lot of auto vendors that have been shook up in the last decade or so. And with the current auto shut down we may see some more shake ups. But I digress.

The lever lock connector may require a tool. Tools start on 323. However I have never seen a tool used.
The 3 lever lock connectors on my PCM were just a matter of moving the lever to the opposite position and removing or installing the connector. I did not use a tool of any type.

Do you have a lever lock connector?

>>>>>Action
 

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
Is the darker piece of the connector a lever?

>>>Action
 

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
Skip the intro and go directly to 2:40. By 3:20 it is all over for the info you want.

>>>>>Action
 

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
Please do post back your experience.

>>>>>>>>>Action
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was able to remove the connector without any problem thanks to your link, Action!

It really was as simple as pressing in the middle of the black piece on the back which then allowed the grey lever to move upwards.

I honestly don't know how things got done in this world before the creation of the Internet and by extension the Ford Forums Online knowledge base.

Thanks again!



 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
And things got done by paying a professional or breaking it and then replacing it.
That type of thing was usually presented by a Ford engineer at new model training around July of each year. Dealerships would send techs to a class put on by a Ford District Service Engineer annually. And the dealership would have to buy a multi-thousand dollar essential tool kit for all of the new things on new cars that required a new tool.

Glad to hear you are moving forward!!!!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: eric_eric_eric

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Glad to hear you are moving forward!!!!
>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
Well, replacement of the solenoid did not work.

Since I originally had started my project in another forum, I'm simply going to post the link to prevent the duplication of information:

https://www.fordfusionforum.com/topic/20400-transmission-shift-solenoid-a-p0751-dtc/

It would be nice if cars weren't such a pain to repair; if they weren't, I'd probably attempt the transmission overhaul myself.

At this point, I guess I'll just keep it as a backup car unless the service manager at the dealership can lend a hand with respect to the cost.

Thanks again for your help.

Sincerely,

Eric
 

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
Modern cars are a pain to work on because the parameters with which they are developed and manufactured are for the most part in conflict.

Design a vehicle that is fuel efficient. Towards a CAFE goal of 27.5 MPG
This dictates a small package that weighs as little as possible. As far as a transmission is concerned, it up shifts multiple times as fast as the engine can handle. The shift has to be very swift. And can reliabily do this job in hundreds of copies and over hundred of thousands of miles.

Oh and it all has to be done at a price, because the consumer isn't goin to pay more for this than they would in some other car that does the same function.

Doesn't really help you, but that is the reason why. Otherwise the 2013 Fusion would be replaced by the 1963 Falcon.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: eric_eric_eric

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
From reading the other forum it does not appear that you are working with a factory shop manual. I would stress that using a factory manual will give you the diagnostics that you are grasping for at this point.

Paper copy or some electronic means I know the diagnostics are very good in the factory manual. (Not Haynes or Chilton or others)

If this can be believed this set is under ten bucks. The seller doesn't specifically state it is a Ford manual and I would ask before placing an order. And based on what you have done so far ten bucks is low risk.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Fusion-Hyb...sh=item2862e73661:g:waQAAOSwAyJbaq39#viTabs_0

I am not a auto transmission tech. But I have gone through a couple with some electronics and have had good results after consulting the shop manual.

>>>>>>>>>>>Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: eric_eric_eric

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the link Action; as usual, you are most helpful. I truly wish the rest of the world had the same innate sense of altruism that motivates your kind deeds. We'd be living in Utopia by now, that much is certain.

When I spoke to AllDataDIY, they informed me that the information on the website comes directly from the manufacturer. Aside from the organizational concerns of the material with hyperlinks as opposed to sequential page numbers, it's not something created by a 3rd party.

In fact, the information about the transmission's internal workings and design are very intricately explained in detail. From what I've read and seen on that YouTube video you posted earlier in this thread, it's complicated but not so much that I could not perform the procedure.

However, I just feel so utterly defeated by the current outcome. Combine that with my extreme dislike of car repair and it's a motivational problem. Having autism makes the concept of learning new material extremely stressful and it was pure hell just to endure the information overload to begin the project.

Perhaps it's just the last few months have been too much for my nerves. Prior to working on the Fusion, I repaired my mother's Toyota by performing a non-conventional repair of the Camry that also required about a month of mental preparation. Learning how the concepts of oil pressure worked within the engine, the role of bearings, the concept of RTV sealant, etc. . . .

https://www.toyotanation.com/threads/balance-shaft-delete-without-plugging-oil-feed.1675207/

I just hate working on cars, to be honest.

I absolutely hate it.
 

·
Administrator
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
OK.

Thanks for the kudos. I truly like working on automobiles. (Especially pre-1972 rides) Many times I get into the thought process of why it was done that way and how an assembly works as designed. (I dislike most modifications eve if they are improvements) However I have never done that as a profession. (I was in service management at Ford Motor Co and several dealerships) I don't believe utopia exists on this planet. However I am more than willing to contribute what I can to get rides back to a fully functioning state. And utopia is pretty far off topic.

I get that you are burned out. And from what I understand this vehicle isn't a required daily driver. So take a break and come back after some time.

Typically complex assemblies CAN be taken in small steps and then divided into easier bites of understanding. This is what a professional tech does. However it is over a span of years! You are attempting the same thing in days or weeks. Not to broadly focused in the transmission universe. Just this 6F35.

As to the AllDataDIY source, I have heard little about diagnosis part. And frankly few owners of any vehicles want to diagnose the concern they just want to do the repair. That is an important step and yet it is like the statement ~ Ready Fire AIM! It misses the mark nearly every time in the end. Either non-failed parts were replaced or the repair just never gets completed. I have not seen that specific factory shop manual. But I do know the thought process for the Ford shop manual. And a diagnostic routine is in almost every aspect of the shop manual for complex assemblies. Usually they are details and take baby steps to achieve a written conclusion to the issue(s). While you are waiting and taking a break you might pick up a copy. My most modern ride is a 2006 model big SUV (actually my mother in law has a 2010 Fusion) and I have every manual the factory ever put out about this vehicle. I don't reference it much any more because the vehicle is in pretty darn good shape for 160,000 miles. But if I need to get into a granular level, the data is there for me.

Good luck to you.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: eric_eric_eric

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Does anyone know how to disconnect the 20 pin connector on the main control cover of a 6F35 transmission?

In this case, it's a 2013 Ford Fusion S model.

Here are some pictures, along with a picture from Motorcraft's connector catalog that looks like a very similar locking mechanism:





I approach it from under the car (a 2014 Transit 2.5L 6F35 XLT LWB Wagon) with a medium to small flat screwdriver, inserting it beneath the lever where the locking tab is depressed to release the lever. The lever grabs onto four small rectangular extrusions on the outside of the stadium-shaped tube emerging thru cover to complete the seal. If the tabs are broken (fatigue or external stress) the stadium-shaped seal may leak. The spill may appear suddenly when parking with the front of the car on a downward slope allowing more fluid to pass. The solution is to replace the Connector plate which contains the recepticle, the Transmission Fluid Temperature sensor and the fuse-like connectors for all of the Pressure Control Solenoids. The Connector is fastened to the body with five (5) T-20 machine screws. The repair can be accomplished on the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hello everyone,

I had to replace the engine wiring harness in my 2014 Ford Fusion and I ran into an issue when trying to connect the 20 pin connector. The piece that the 20 pin connector is supposed to connect to on the transmission is broken on the top and the connector won't stay connected. How can I replace this or do you recommend I take it to a mechanic?

Thank you all in advance!

View attachment 51059
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top