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Discussion Starter #1
My 2013 E350 Extended was working fine...Until it wasnt. AC was cool, though not as cold as I believe it should, but as well as it had in the 3 years Ive owned it. All of a sudden the transmission blew on the highway, leaving me to limp along at 10mph to the offramp where fate brought me to a transmission repair shop.
Just got the van back today, with a rebuilt tranny installed, and as the day was getting warm, flipped on the AC and got cooked !
Not just warm air, but as hot, possibly hotter, than if I had turned the heater on full blast instead Switching to Max AC made it even Hotter!
I crawled under the van to see if maybe there were visible damage somewhere, and burned my hand on the aluminum refrigerant lines heading to the rear AC. All of them were hot

Is there something that the repair shop may have messed up? Is it a symptom of some other problem created when the tranny died? Is it something that could have Caused the tranny failure?
At least the transmission seems to be working now, but good gods, I cant drive in a rolling EZBake oven!
Any clues or hints out here in Forum land?
I dont want to accuse the shop of a fault that may not be theirs, but I cant get past the "it was working before they touched it" train of thought
 

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could be as simple as a vacuum hose disconnected. contact the trans place and ask if it could be as a result of the trans replacement. be nice
 

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Was the compressor running?

If not, there is not enough refrigerant in the system and the aluminum AC lines picked up ambient heat

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Discussion Starter #4
Was the compressor running?

If not, there is not enough refrigerant in the system and the aluminum AC lines picked up ambient heat

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Have not checked to see if compressor was running, but the lines were hot enough to burn, I think thats a bit more than "ambient heat" no?
 
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The metal AC lines in my Navigator are located on the right side of the engine above the right exhaust manifold. With no charge in the system they would absorb a lot of heat.

But let's not focus on that and see if the AC compressor is operating.

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Discussion Starter #6
Compressor is NOT kicking on.
As I said, the AC was working when I pulled it into the shop. I have had many a vehicle go low on freon, and the compressor always would cycle on and off. Do these systems just stop outright when they get a little low?
I called the tranny shop, asked if they could take a look-see, and they piped right in with "we dont do AC and nothing we did would have anything to do with it" I pressed them to at least look at it, and they finally agreed to, for whatever thats worth.
 
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Do these systems just stop outright when they get a little low?
YES!

There is a low pressure switch. When the pressure in the system drops below a certain pressure the power to the AC compressor clutch is stopped. This protects the compressor from damage because the compressor is only lubricated with oil that is mixed in with the referigerant. No referigerant and the oil is not moving through the system.

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Discussion Starter #8
Is there anything I can check for that could have been disconnected when the tranny was pulled out? Connectors, switches, or the like? I dont have any equipment for testing refrigerant levels short of bringing it in to a repair place. It was my belief that the refrigerant lines ran across the top of the tranny over to the drivers side and then back to the rear unit, which is why I thought the lines might have been damaged during the trans. replacement. Im happy enough to crawl around and poke things if there might be anything I can look for.
As always, Much Thanks to you forum members who are a fount of information!
 
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There can be two switches inline to the AC system. The low pressure switch and a high pressure switch. Both will be under the hood. Some systems do not have a hgh pressure switch. I am not familar with the newer Econoline as to locations. But would be easy to find.

The lines across the rear of the engine would go to the compressor. The previous generation Econoline had the compressor mounted on the driver's side. The high pressure switch if equipped will be near the compressor and inline.

The low pressure switch will be on the right side. Not sure how the lines are routed for dual air.

To remove the transmission it is doubtfull the AC lines would be disconnected. The transmission would have come out the bottom of the vehicle and away from the engine. You can inspect the lines. Pay attention to joints that may not be tight and show signs of dripping. That would be oil seeping out of a joint that is not tight or has a leaking O ring.

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