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Discussion Starter #1
I went to drive my '92 Explorer, which had been sitting for a couple of weeks, and it acted like the brakes were locked. I jacked each wheel up individually and each would turn freely, but the vehicle still wouldn't move without acting like the brakes were on. I then pumped the pedal several times and it freed up and drove normally. The calipers, hoses, pads and rotors have been replaced within the past year. The truck has a tendency to slide the left front tire if the brakes are applied quickly, but not necessarily very hard. That's why the brakes were re-done. It didn't seem to help much.I'm wondering if the master cylinder is bad or if it might be the proportioning valve. Any ideas? L. O. G.
 

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A dual master cylinder is specific to front and back brake application. NOT side to side. In fact the valving is the same way. Front to back yes. Side to side no

Un equal side to side front braking application issues could be:
Calipers - pistons hanging up
Caliper mounting - pins/slides not lubricated
Debris in the friction material on one side
Loose wheel bearings
Flexible brake line issue
Debris in fluid

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Discussion Starter #4
Dominick 1: It has anti-lock on the rear only. Some say the system is unreliable and prone to failure and that it is best to eliminate it. So far I haven't got around to trying that. I believe the line from the master cylinder would have to have to have the fitting nut replaced, as it is a larger outside size, but has a small line. It won't fit a standard coupling and if one tries to use a larger threaded adapter, the seat for the flare and the through hole is too large for the smaller brake line. It will fit, but there is very little contact area with the flared end of the line. It doesn't look like the seal would be very dependable. Action: I never heard of a cylinder working side-to-side either. I've replaced the calipers, wheel bearings, hoses and pads, lubed the pins and pumped fresh fluid through the calipers until it came out clean. It made no noticeable difference in the way the brakes acted. I thought it might be a tire problem, but changing tires didn't change anything either.(I thought maybe the tread rubber had hardened with age) By the way, I've never had the standard check lists for problems work for me. It always turn out to be something else. Usually something weird and unexpected. Maybe it's contrary to the will of God that I try to fix cars.
 

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Dominick 1: It has anti-lock on the rear only. Some say the system is unreliable and prone to failure and that it is best to eliminate it. So far I haven't got around to trying that. I believe the line from the master cylinder would have to have to have the fitting nut replaced, as it is a larger outside size, but has a small line. It won't fit a standard coupling and if one tries to use a larger threaded adapter, the seat for the flare and the through hole is too large for the smaller brake line. It will fit, but there is very little contact area with the flared end of the line. It doesn't look like the seal would be very dependable. Action: I never heard of a cylinder working side-to-side either. I've replaced the calipers, wheel bearings, hoses and pads, lubed the pins and pumped fresh fluid through the calipers until it came out clean. It made no noticeable difference in the way the brakes acted. I thought it might be a tire problem, but changing tires didn't change anything either.(I thought maybe the tread rubber had hardened with age) By the way, I've never had the standard check lists for problems work for me. It always turn out to be something else. Usually something weird and unexpected. Maybe it's contrary to the will of God that I try to fix cars.
 

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By the way, I've never had the standard check lists for problems work for me. It always turn out to be something else. Usually something weird and unexpected. Maybe it's contrary to the will of God that I try to fix cars.
The above list is from my head not a standard list.

Something is an issue as your description is not normal. Even for a vehicle that sits for weeks, then you jack up a wheel and it spins freely.

One other thing that comes to mind and your location might support this. Higher humidity and longer storage after brakes have been hot. I have had the experience where brakes (rotors) rust while sitting. The vehicle braking system was hot and then parked for a longer period of time. Rotors rusts a bit and on the next drive they were an issue with sticking. This is a one time event upon the next driving because the pads will clean off the rotors in the first couple of miles and this will not occur until the vehicle sits for a long time again. Your location has 60% humidity right now.

Just a possibility that might explain a side to side issue of the vehicle sits for longer periods of time for the first time driving after sitting.

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I would think if the rubber brake hose was coming apart inside where you could not see it
that would not give even pressure to the affected wheel
Just a thought
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have heard of this happening. The hoses have been replaced. My granddaughter's husband says he had to replace the proportioning valve on one which was acting this way in order to cure the problem. I will likely try that since everything else has been replaced. Assuming they are still available, that is.
 

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I have heard of this happening. The hoses have been replaced. My granddaughter's husband says he had to replace the proportioning valve on one which was acting this way in order to cure the problem. I will likely try that since everything else has been replaced. Assuming they are still available, that is.
Tht could be your problem
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So far, it appears that the proportioning valve is integral with the ABS system, not a separate part. The good news is that Cardone sells a rebuilt ABS valve unit for about $110 plus core charge, which I assume is refundable. Dunno yet. Some proportioning valves are around $400 each. It doesn't appear to be too hard to replace, either. We shall see as soon as I get around to it. I did get a Haynes manual for Explorers 1991-2001 so maybe it will be of some help. L. O. G.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
From looking in the Haynes manual plus parts vendors sites online, it looks like the ABS consists of a valve assembly on the frame, an electronic control module under the dash, a relay, a sensor on the differential housing and a ring inside the differential housing. I found no info on how to test the various components of the system. It shouldn't be too hard to test the relay, but I don't really think that is the problem. I could just replace the control module and valve, which would cost about $200. Being both broke and cheap, I hate to just replace a part that may be still good. Any suggestions?
 

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The Haynes manual lacks detail of a factory manual set. While more expensive will give you far more detail and diagnosis that Haynes, Motors or Chilton manuals.

As you stated and expressed by redrag, you are experiencing a braking issue not an antilock issue. Antilock has always been designed that if not functioning in any manner, no adverse impact would be created in the brake system. Car manufacturers have a big target on their virtual back and get sued for everything. If an ABS system failed and cause braking issues beyond no ABS there would be a law suit.

So stated another way than redrag, more on, there is nothing to see in the abs system for your concern.

In my opinion the issue is not parts related, it is labor related. Lots of parts have been replaced. However they are installed makes a difference in braking operation.

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Hi I had a 1981 Lincoln Continental Mark 6 and I had a locking brake situation too and it was like when you were driving it and put the brakes on they would"rear brakes" skid and stick and stay on until you pump the brakes and then it kind of got better but what it turned out to be for me was the master cylinder was bad I hope this helps?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi I had a 1981 Lincoln Continental Mark 6 and I had a locking brake situation too and it was like when you were driving it and put the brakes on they would"rear brakes" skid and stick and stay on until you pump the brakes and then it kind of got better but what it turned out to be for me was the master cylinder was bad I hope this helps?

The problem turned out to be the booster. When trying to bleed the brakes my helper noticed that the pedal would stick just short of full return. When lifting the pedal with his toes, it would "pop" and return to normal position. I removed the booster and tried it off vehicle. When the rod was pushed in and pulled back it would stop an what appeared to be the normal position, but when pulled hard it would "pop" and go further. I put a new one on and everything works fine, so I guess it wasn't bad parts installation after all. Brakes work and the RABS system is bypassed. One more source of trouble eliminated. Now waiting for the next thing to go wrong.
 

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Yeah so like I told you
46857
lo george, it was the master cylinder brake / booster it usually comes as an assembly together I guess you can buy them separately but I just replaced both together and it fixed my problem looks like it fixed yours too, thanks ,for the thanks?
 
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