Ford Automobiles banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Rear most core plug, right side, sprung a leak. I believe all the lower plugs are shallow depth and the only 1 1/2" plug I could find in town is a deep plug. Can I install a deep plug in that location, leaving the excess depth to the outside instead of setting it flush, and expect good results? Would setting it flush on the outside restrict coolant flow in the block?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,452 Posts
core plugs seal on the outer edge. if theres no room to put it all the way in it will leak
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
Not really. The water jacket runs above and a little below the plug. At least most plugs are near the bottom of the block. Which means most coolant will flow above the plug opening.

Action
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
Attached are images swiped from ebay.
First picture showing bottom of engine.
THEN
Engine up side down rear of the engine attached to the engine stand
Right side
Then left side

The core plugs are in the middle. Should have enough space for coolant to flow around. However a plug isn;t that expensive. Getting the correct one may be a better solution
Action
s-l1600.jpg


s-l1600 (2).jpg
s-l1600 (1).jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It turns out the core plug location that was leaking is where the block heater was installed. The clamp mechanism had broken and the o-ring was trashed. Installing a new block heater was much easier than driving in a new core plug.
46384
46385
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
Looks like you have another problem. An oil leak.

Action
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Looks like you have another problem. An oil leak.

Action
LOL! You bet I have an oil leak, but at least now the coolant is staying inside the engine, where it belongs. The right valve cover weeps a bit at the front and at the rear and it looks like the front crank seal leaks as well. It sure would be nice if the intake manifold did cove the valve cover, so I have to remove the top half of the intake to remove the valve cover. Can the front crank seal be replaced with the engine still in the truck? How big a job would that be? Winter is coming and my workspace is outside in the driveway.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
You said, "Can the front crank seal be replaced with the engine still in the truck? How big a job would that be? "

The answer is yes. Engine can stay in the vehicle.
The seal is in the front cover. So the front cover would need to be removed. That means removing at the minimum the following items
Radiator fan and fan belts
Alternator
Loosening the power steering pump and moving out of the way
Same for AC compressor expect it is harder to work because it is heavier
Water pump with both radiator hoses
Vibration dampener with pulleys - this requires a puller with some grunt power
Then you get to the front timing cover

With the cover removed the front seal can be pushed out and a new one pushed in.
Reverse to re-assemble and use a torque wrench and torque bolts to spec.

Above is the minimum. Optional items
Remove the radiator. This will give you more room. And a chance to really flush out the radiator
Replace the timing chain and gear set. There is only one bolt left on the cam to do that.
Replace the oil pump if you want to slightly lift the engine and loosen the oil pan.
Paint the front cover.
Paint the oil pan is you decide to remove the oil pan instead of just drop it.

I did al of the above including the optional items (and replaced the heads) on a 1990 E150 with a 351 in 2010. The engine had about 150,000 miles. The goal was just to replace the heads because I had a burned exhaust valve. Then I discovered some slack in the timing chain. After it was all done (for rather cheap) because it was mostly labor, the engine had some more power I did not know it had. I was rather please with the job.

Action
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the run down. That is pretty much what I thought would be involved.

I do have another problem with this engine being a dead cylinder. No. 8 cylinder has been dead for a few years and I just haven't had the resources, both time and money, to dig into it much further. What I know for sure is it has spark and fuel, just no compression. I don't know yet if the issue is rings, or valves. This engine only has around 130,000 km (80,000 miles), according to what the previous owner told me. The PO must have worked it pretty hard as he said he replaced the original engine at 160,000 km (100,000 m). It has had a gentle life with me, with only around 30,000 km in the 20 years I've had it. I'm sure there is a lot of lost power to be found in this engine.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
#8 is the last cylinder on the left side.
Burned exhaust valve would be a guess. A compression test wet and dry would confirm

This is the reason I did the work in the E150 above. It had a burned exhaust valve because the PO did not service the cooling system and engine overheated. When I was done the engine ran better than ever.

Action
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
When I first determined #8 was the dead one it still showed compression with my tester. I swapped spark plugs and fuel injectors around and it was still dead, so I thought it might be electrical in the signal to the FI. I more recently build a noid light and it showed a good signal to the injector, so I did a compression test again and it showed 0. I'm leaning towards stuck valves as I have been getting a fair bit of blow by out of the valve cover vent into the air box. It gets bad enough at times that there is oil residue leaking out the bottom of the air box and running down the inner fender.

I have thought that it might be fun to do a drive way rebuild. No machine work, just a ball hone to resurface the cylinders for new rings. A stock reman kit and gaskets and seals shouldn't be too much money, I just don't need another project to start right now.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
I would suggest doing a compression test with a compression tester. In the US you might be able to borrow one from a parts store. Not sure about Saskatchewan. A low cost one would be $20 to $40. (US)

The dry test will let you know for sure there is an issue.
The wet test (a couple of squirks of oil) will let you know if it is rings or something else. The oil would seal (temporarily) the rings so compression would come up from the dry test. No amount of oil will make compression changes for a burned value.

I did my 5.8l engine refresh in the driveway. Exchanged heads got rid of the burned valve with zero machining. The rest of the stuff was done was just R&R. Complete with factory colored engine paint on many parts, the job after a year or so looked like nothing had ever been done. Which was the look I wanted.

Action
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I have a couple of compression testers, so I'm good there. Yeah, a wet test is probably something I should do before any disassembly. The left VC doesn't leak oil, so best not to break the seal until absolutely necessary. We're soon running out of weather for doing major work in the driveway. If it is rings, then the engine will have to come out to R&R the piston and rings.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
If the issue is rings, it may be less $ to replace the engine instead of machining.
I replaced a 4.6l in a Mark VIII with a used engine some years back. Far less $ than going inside. And I got 100,000 miles out of the used one.

Action
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top