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Discussion Starter #1
Open to all: I own a 2005 Ford Escape XLT with 162000+ miles. I have read in different
auto maintenance web sites that it is reccommended to replace the Intake Manifold
gaskets every 75000 miles. Currently there are no fluid leaks. The engine does not have
any symptoms of normal highway/Interstate/city driving. A tune up was performed last year.
I have also looked to get an estimate for labor & parts (which I have) to be performed.
Should I proceed to have the Intake Manifold gaskets replaced? I am planning on
keeping the vehicle and handing it to our older son for his 2nd transporation.

Looking forward to your replies.
Steve in NM
 

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What does the Ford dealer say?
Is it normal maintenance
If you have an owners manual it should tell you
 

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My reply is NO!
If the gasket does not leak, why replace it??


If you can, post the reference to replacing.

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Discussion Starter #5
My reply is NO!
If the gasket does not leak, why replace it??


If you can, post the reference to replacing.

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Thanks for your reply. Since the vehicle is approaching 15 years, I was very much cncerned about being several owners from new, if this would need to be on my list of items for replacement. Thnx for your help.
 

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Yeah, replacing a gasket that is not leaking would tie up cash that can be used in other areas.
A well maintained vehicle is key to getting lots of use and high miles. Few vehicles are well maintained over the long haul.
I have a 2006 Navigator with 175,000 miles. Unless I get unlucky and get into a car accident, I am expecting at least another 100,000 miles. I sold a 1991 E 150 with 213,000 that had very good power train. Interior was coming apart but it was a van conversion with a non-Ford interior

How long have you owned the vehicle?

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On my 2010 escape (v6) I had to replace the gasket after doing the spark plugs. Not sure which engine you have but I believe the v6 in your year requires you to pull the intake to get access to the second half of plugs. The kit is dirt cheap however so if you do spark plugs on it at some point go ahead. The gasket itself isn't really that important.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, replacing a gasket that is not leaking would tie up cash that can be used in other areas.
A well maintained vehicle is key to getting lots of use and high miles. Few vehicles are well maintained over the long haul.
I have a 2006 Navigator with 175,000 miles. Unless I get unlucky and get into a car accident, I am expecting at least another 100,000 miles. I sold a 1991 E 150 with 213,000 that had very good power train. Interior was coming apart but it was a van conversion with a non-Ford interior

How long have you owned the vehicle?

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I have owned it for 2 years. Put a lot of needed money in since I purchased it in an unknown state. Some of the repairs I could have lived w/o replacement(s). The intake manifold does not show any signs of leaks or any visible liquid residue.
Curious if 162K+ miles is standard for gasket replacement(s).
 

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In my opinion, gasket replacement is only needed if the gasket fails or if the parts the gasket is sealing are removed.
Some gaskets are reusable
I have not seen anything from the Company that requires or suggests that an intake manifold gasket should be replaced as a regular maintenance routine.

With that said I am aware some older V-6 engines with intake manifold issues. Those issues show up in a significant percentage of engines. And the manifold was redesigned. Replacement of that requires gasket replacement.

If there is any question on the integrity of the intake gasket getting a vacuum reading after the engine is warmed up would answer that question swiftly. And a vacuum gauge is an excellent diagnostic tool for understanding the condition of an engine and how efficiently is it running.

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