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Discussion Starter #1
I need a new damper. I'm wondering if any of you have replaced the stock Harmonic balancer on your FE motor. Some of the aftermarket fluid dampers say "may need adapters". Hell, some say they're for GM pulleys, geez. If you have replaced yours with a "new" one what did you use? Did it work with stock pulleys?

LR
 

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Most FE engines are internally balanced and only run a pulley on the crank. I have never used a fluid damper. Since there would be no advantage in the balance I am not sure of the benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can see how not having vulcanized rubber would be a plus. Right now their are a couple of fluid dampers on ebay that are a little less than a new stock replacement. When I asked about using stock pulleys with them the response was "they should work". I would feel better if someone told me that they have used these fluid dampers in a stock replacement.
 

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Watch out for cheapo off shore crap. The timing marks might be close , might be right, who knows, Chang don't give a stinkin' turd if they're in the right spot. I have a Chevy High Performance mag. and one of the editors is whining about the free dampner he got from a friend and the 4 deg. advance on the marks has grenaded the same motor a few times.
 

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Lip Ripper,

what motor do you have and how many cid as FE (ford-edsel) motors were mfg. from 1958-1976 on both internally and externally balanced engines. There are Fluidamprs available for these engines. you are correct about vulcanized rubber or elastomer dampers. Fluid-filled (viscous type) dampers are far superior dampers as they are able to dampen harmonic vibrations at all rpm's whereas elastomer dampers are frequancy sensitive and is designed to function throughout only a narrow predetermined vibration frequancy bandwidth. Tuned or frequancy sensitive stock dampers rely on a specific durometer of elastomer (again, rubber) to absorb the harmoncic vibrations produced by the engine and are limited to that bandwidth of vibration frequancies. Any aftermarket change to a stock motor (change in piston mass, rods or crankshaft) will change the natural frequancy which the damper was designed for. As maytag says be careful of the cheap chinese nock-offfs. i reccomend FLUIDAMPR. Fluidampr a division of Vibratech TVD who invented viscous type dampers in 1946 and they are 100% engineered and manufactured here in the USA. They are the best viscous damper on the market. Hope this helps. Buy USA... keep americans to work!!
 

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to answer your other questions "should work"... depending on the engine most stock pulleys do work with Fluidampr. They also have pulley spacers available for alignment.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It is a 66 390 however I am running the 68 pulley configuration. This was necessary to power my Classic Auto Air AC add on. It is internally balanced. Thanks for the input. Spacers are one thing I want to avoid. I want a damper that bolts right to my existing set up.

LR
 

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Lip Ripper,

what motor do you have and how many cid as FE (ford-edsel) motors were mfg. from 1958-1976
is that what they were? my parts department book says it stood for FORD ENGINE
 

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Go with a factory dampener and good to go vs wasting money on any brand of fluid dampeners on the market unless your einging it 5-7K rpm's most the time. These FE's all have a heavy cranks not known to have cracking issues even being cast vs forged cranks. One exception the cast 428's which should be checked for possible cracks before spending money polishing or grinding journals. Even then it's not that common of an issue with 428 cracked cranks considering 10 out of 11 of them I have were crack free. The cracked 428 came out of a Mustang drag car with 4 spd hammered down the 1/4 on weekends for several years at 6,800 revs.
Back to dampeners, they were pressed on not vulcanized and over time could of slipped throwing the timing marks off. A must if the rubber is still sound is to check that zero -0- marking matches the piston at true TDC when the heads were off. If not at zero make a note and allow correcting when timing the engine. Who times a FE anyway to factory timing specs unless "good enough" is your thing? Mechanical and vacuum advance tuning as there is a lot to be gained, it's all in the details understanding these FE's. One good idea is to scribe a line across the hub and dampener ring allowing checking if the ring had slipped. Dampener along with crank, rods and pistons plus flywheel or flexplate all zero balanced makes for easy parts swapping not creating vibration issues.
Backing up 95 to 98% FE's were internally balanced so not an issue finding a replacement dampener, pony up not like your replacing it every year. Beware of the 428 dampeners (good luck finding $$$ one) they are externally balanced as well the flex plate or flywheel in two amounts out of balance. You don't want to make a shaker more than the factory run of FE engines which where not been dead nuts perfectly balanced.
I never had an issue being out of balance or requiring balancing after adding forged pistons, 13/32" LR 427 rods (polished & shot peened) on a standard 428 crank which was converted to internally balanced vs externally only at the flywheel end dampener end factory zero balanced. The 410 FE build a smooth engine 35 years and counting running clean at 273K miles. Has 427 LR heads w/stainless valves, hard exhaust seat inserts, roller tip rockers, built to run on unleaded rubbish back in 85......~~=o&o>.......
 
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