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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a '63 Ford Falcon. It's been sitting for 20 years. Have been working on it to get it on the road again. 6 cylinder, 170, 2.8L. The transmission didn't have any fluid on the dipstick. So when it was at operating temperature and running, I added a quart of transmission fluid. I proceeded to add another quart when half way thru adding it, the engine began running rough and white smoke billowed out the exhaust. It took 15 minutes for the smoke to mostly clear. Decided to take a break and come back to it. It started fine, no smoke.

Based on what I've been reading, it seems that the vacuum modulator valve needs replaced. Does this sound like I'm on the right track? If so, how does one go about changing the vacuum modulator valve? Is it inside or outside the transmission? Please provide detailed info on how to change. Assume I know nothing.

Thanks for your help! :)
 

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easiest way to locate it is to follow the vacuum line from your intake down toward the transmission, and where it ends is where your modulator is. it should be on the right(passenger) side. the way to check it is to take the hose off, and see if any fluid drips out(or really wet), if so then there is your problem, if not there may be more to this. but we'll cross that bridge when we get that far.
 

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Check to make sure your lines are ok too. The smoke may have been caused by tranny fluid dripping on the exhaust.
 

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Check to make sure your lines are ok too. The smoke may have been caused by tranny fluid dripping on the exhaust.
i agree with that. both checks are free, so that's where i would start
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a dumb question. Since one is to check the transmission fluid when the vehicle is running and at operating temp, I was assuming that one should also pour the transmission fluid in while running. Could pouring the transmission fluid in while the engine is running cause the car to the white billow smoke?
 

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well, unless you accidently spill some directly into the carb. try this,locate the vacuum line that goes from you transmission modulator and follow it to your carb. with engine off, pull the line off the carb and visually inspect for any trace of fluid.
 

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well, unless you accidently spill some directly into the carb. try this,locate the vacuum line that goes from you transmission modulator and follow it to your carb. with engine off, pull the line off the carb and visually inspect for any trace of fluid.
i already suggested that,but going back to the trans. it should have pooled up in the lower point
 

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sorry,but...

i already suggested that,but going back to the trans. it should have pooled up in the lower point
63falcon in the origional post stated the smoke was comming out of the exhaust. if it was just smoking,i could possibly see that.
 

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keeps mosquitoes away... also pisses off guys with porches while the top is down and they're on their cell phones, looking like douche bags... :ihih:

it's definitely sucking in the trans fluid. has the level gone down since you've added? that's the only line (with my knowlege of the c4) that goes to either the carb, or intake, and causes you to burn it.
 

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Jonzo, you threw me for a loop there. I'm thinkin, what's wrong with using my phone when I'm on the porch? Now I get it. "Porsche's". I live 20 minutes from Sebring Raceway and I see a lot of Porsche's goin up and down US 27. Funny thing is I can't remember seeing a drop top. I guess there suspensions are inferior to the coupes so the boys don't race with them.

LR
 

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After you find the true source of your "smoking problem", I'd top off the trans fluid with Seafoam brand transmission conditioner.

Then after driving the car for a few hundred miles drop the pan & replace the filter. Add the remaining trans conditioner to the trans then top it back off with regular trans fluid.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
We checked the line going from the modulator to manifold. It was full of transmission fluid. Blew if out with compressed air. Replaced the modulator valve. It was a bear. Had to cut a box end wrench in half to get it to fit in the limited work space. Took the pan off. Put a drain plug in it. Cut a gasket. Put Humpty back together. Transmission fluid reads full on the dipstick. No more smoking. That problem appears solved. Seems to shift a bit smoother now.

Replacing the the modulator didn't seem to have any affect on the dying once warmed up. I was hoping to kill two birds with one stone. After warmed up it dies about 1/3 of the time when put in reverse. Let it cool and it runs fine again. Dies sometimes while in gear. Seems to run smooth until it dies. No missing out, etc.

Thoughts other than putting in an inline filter right before the carb? This is sounding like the next approach. Figured I'd start by taking off the fuel filter at the pump and see what there is to see there.
 
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