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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2011 escape with 40k miles. It has a problem starting. The engine will cranks for a long time before starting. I found that if I turn the key from off to on a few times the car will start right up. I disconnected the fuel line and connected a gauge on the line from the tank. I turned the key and noticed the pressure went to 10psi. The pressure then slowly went to 0psi. Turning the key multiple times increases the pressure by 10psi every key cycle. My scan tool can not read the pressure sensor. Does anybody know what might cause me this and what I can do to further narrow down the problem? Is 10psi too low? How long should it take for the pressure to bleed off? Thanks in advance.
 

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I have a 2011 escape with 40k miles. It has a problem starting. The engine will cranks for a long time before starting. I found that if I turn the key from off to on a few times the car will start right up. I disconnected the fuel line and connected a gauge on the line from the tank. I turned the key and noticed the pressure went to 10psi. The pressure then slowly went to 0psi. Turning the key multiple times increases the pressure by 10psi every key cycle. My scan tool can not read the pressure sensor. Does anybody know what might cause me this and what I can do to further narrow down the problem? Is 10psi too low? How long should it take for the pressure to bleed off? Thanks in advance.
Watch this and see if it relates to your problem
https://www.fordforumsonline.com/threads/2009-ford-canister-purge-valves-multiple-codes.12160/
 

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10 PSI is way too low and not high enough to operate the fuel injectors.

To maintain fuel pressure there are two things needed.
A fuel pump to move fuel and develop pressure.
A pressure regulator to maintain that pressure.

The fuel system is looped. Meaning the fuel system has fuel that fills the fuel rail on the engine and loops back to the fuel tank. The strongest pump in the world can not make pressure if the system is wide open.

So you would need to know that both parts are functional. The pump and the pressure regulator.

The pressure regulator compensates for engine load by increasing fuel pressure as the engine vacuum drops. Removing the vacuum line to the pressure regulator when the engine is running should spike the fuel pressure in the fuel rail and at the injectors to the highest possible in the fuel rail.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I believe the escape has a return less fuel system. The pressure is regulated by controlling the speed of the pump based on the pressure sensor. I was told the fuel filter is not servicable. I couldn’t find it. FYI this is a 3.0 engine. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just to add, once running the engine runs fine. The problem is only when starting. There are no codes reported in the ecu Thanks again
 

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This is what I am finding for 2011 Ford Escape fuel filter. (On multiple sites)

https://www.carid.com/2011-ford-escape-fuel-filters/?filter=1&sub-model[Liter][]=3.0L

This is a typical fuel filter that Ford has used since fuel injection was installed on trucks. The filters do vary in size and flow however the filters are similar since the early 1990s. The location is in line usually a short distance from the fuel tank. Many times concealed by a shield to prevent debris hitting the filter and causing a leak.

With 40,000 miles that isn't a lot for a 8 model year old vehicle. It is possible the filter has caught enough debris to be an issue. If some of that debris is water it could freeze depending on your location. Or cause rust. It may be possible the fuel pump needs some time to build that pressure because of restrictions. At least I would recommend replacing the fuel filter based on a maintenance basis.

The fact that the vehicle runs well enough once started is a statement about the pump. The highest fuel consumption would be at highway speeds. If at those speeds the vehicle runs well and when accelerated during that type of operation does not show issues one could say that there is enough fuel and at a high enough pressure to do the job.

However 10 or 20 PSI or less than 30 PSI isn't enough to make the injectors squirt fuel. Injectors will not spray even if it receives an electrical signal from the processor if there isn't enough pressure in the fuel rail. The injector needs that type of pressure to spray the correct amount of fuel in a pattern that will light off the combustion cycle.

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Here is a simplified image of a generic returnless fuel system. There is still pressure control over the system using a sensor. A sensor or module failure will likely generate a code. (As will injector and may be pump failures) The filter has no electrical input. And you are not reporting a CEL or or codes either.

To answer another question of yours as far as bleed down times for fuel pressure. In my experience that is fairly rapid on systems that have a return. In those systems with no vacuum to the regulator fuel is prevented from returning to the tank. However it will bleed back to the tank via the pressure side in a few seconds when the pump is shut off. Typically while cranking in those systems the pressure build up is a second or two as well. As the fuel pump will come on a pressurize the fuel rail almost in a second because the ignition switch to the fuel pump at engine on while the key is being moved over to engine start.

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Returnless-Fuel-System.jpg
 
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