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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just dropped a fresh 390 and c6 in my 66, and found out I developed a ground somewhere. Anyone know a good quick disconnect for a battery at the terminal so I can take a little time finding it without having to unbolt my terminals 12 times a day?
 

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How to find a short to ground
Disconnect the positive battery cable and put a test light between it and the positive post. IF you have a drain, the light will light.
Now start pulling fuses until the light goes out. TAKE A PICTURE OF YOUR FUSE BOX FIRST! you will want to put the fuses back in their correct positions (different colors are different amperages)

(NOTE: in a '66 you'll have the glass see through type of fuses that are not color coded. However you won't need to pull them all the way out, just pull one side out and tip it away from the connector.)
Then start putting fuses back in. If the light comes on, keep that fuse out and continue installing the rest of the fuses.
AT this point you may have one or more fuses out of the box, you will need a wiring diagram to see what components are on those fuses. Then you can start disconencting the components to take them out of the circuit, and then other connectors in the circuit, until you can narrow down where the short is. Be aware that there are some circuits that will be hot all the time, and create a little draw, such as the clock radio, and keep alive memory for the PCM, perhaps others.
Note: Using this method justaguy found a stuck relay. He said, "So I used your advice and used the test light. I went though all of the fuses and the relays again. I climbed up and took the wires off of the glow plug relay and then the air heater relay, thats when the light dimmed. I replaced the relay... so far so good!"
BogHog said:
Joe,i'd like to add a step to your procedure if that ok with you.
When you disconnect the battery you may break a parasitic connection.How I do it is connect one lead of the test light or meter to the cable being removed and the other end of the test light or meter to the center of the post of the battery.Then I slide the cable off the post and I never interrupt the connection.You will find far more draws this way when you don't break the circuit.
Make your own short tester/locator
Tech Make your own short tester/locator
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, that should help a lot. Any idea of how to build a switch to remove the battery from the circuit without having to disconnect the terminals until I can get around to checking the wiring? This ould save me a lot of time removing the terminals every time I drive it. It has to be my daily driver for the next couple of weeks.
 

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Any idea of how to build a switch to remove the battery from the circuit without having to disconnect the terminals until I can get around to checking the wiring?
Have you considered using either a Quick Disconnect Battery Terminal or a Battery Disconnect Switch?
 

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BTW, you only need to break the connection on one side of the battery, most prefer disconencting the neg cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the input!
Picked one up at auto zone and I'll put it on after I clean all the batt acid out of my engine compartment. My voltage regulator died and I was maxing out the guage on amps, causing the battery to froth. Replaced the regulator and threw on a new backup alternator, but the AMP light is still on and the gauge is reading a hair over 14.
I just need to spring for a painless kit and redo all the wiring.
 

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the AMP light is still on and the gauge is reading a hair over 14.
I assume that you are speaking of voltage here.
I don't know about the older cars, but I imagine that they are the same in that the newer cars, expect the alternator to put out 14.4 volts.

With a fully charged battery you should have 12.66 volts with the engine off, with it running 14.4 volts.
 

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I also suggest an Optima yellow top battery. Had mine in the car for 4yrs, still spins it over like a top.
the mopar battery in my car now has lasted 14 years, and still no problems...
i had a ford heavy truck battery (now sterling) that lasted me 11
 

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I assume that you are speaking of voltage here.
I don't know about the older cars, but I imagine that they are the same in that the newer cars, expect the alternator to put out 14.4 volts.

With a fully charged battery you should have 12.66 volts with the engine off, with it running 14.4 volts.
if it goes over 15V, get a new Batt. and keep that one for a '32
 
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