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Have 1965 Galaxie 500 convertible. Every appearance item is stock. Looking to upgrade headlights, possibly to HID/LED lights but not a fan of the Darth Vader appearance. Any helpful do's and don'ts would be welcome.
 

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Have 1965 Galaxie 500 convertible. Every appearance item is stock. Looking to upgrade headlights, possibly to HID/LED lights but not a fan of the Darth Vader appearance. Any helpful do's and don'ts would be welcome.
Hello Barry in Jax,

I'm in the process of this myself on our '66's and '68 Full size Fords. I found the standard round 5-3/4" round headlamp housings that will accept an H4 bulb, they are just glass composite headlamps. I am using 100/140 watt clear halogen H4's for the 4 headlamps in each car. The high/low headlamps will go through automatically resetting circuit breakers and relays direct to the battery and triggered from the existing headlamp wiring.

I did this already in our '79 Dodge truck and it has for rectangular headlamps from the factory so I put in the rectangular composites and 100/140 watt clear halogens and boy oh boy is it bright on high beams. The interesting thing is I tried the blue-ish tinge H4's and the new windscreen we installed in it actually attenuated the light through the windscreen. If you rolled down the door window and looked out, it was noticeably brighter. The new windscreen attenuated the blue spectrum. So putting in clear halogens still gives a decent white light with no notable attenuation through the windscreen.

I am not sold on the LED conversions currently. I would have to extensively test some brands for me to try them in an actual car. I wouldn't even try one with the little cheap looking fan on the backside. Our cars are daily drivers and I can't have nonsense breaking or failing from cheaply made products. I guess for a Sunday driver or once a month car, they might be ok. That's just not my cup of tea.

Cheers
 

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Thanks for the reply. While mine may not be a daily driver, I intend to put the maximum allowable on it each year once it is done (I think that is 2500 vs the 650 I have put on year after year). So I agree; no room for cheap fails. I'd rather pay for it once then all over again.
 

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Daniel Stern Lighting - good guy - knows his stuff. I used his some of his kit to do a simple upgrade the ride in my sig. LEDs were not a requirement in my case; just good 'old' halogens while reducing the load carried by the headlight switch; managed to avoid cutting any wires; too.
Kevin
 
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Hello Barry in Jax,

I'm in the process of this myself on our '66's and '68 Full size Fords. I found the standard round 5-3/4" round headlamp housings that will accept an H4 bulb, they are just glass composite headlamps. I am using 100/140 watt clear halogen H4's for the 4 headlamps in each car. The high/low headlamps will go through automatically resetting circuit breakers and relays direct to the battery and triggered from the existing headlamp wiring.

I did this already in our '79 Dodge truck and it has for rectangular headlamps from the factory so I put in the rectangular composites and 100/140 watt clear halogens and boy oh boy is it bright on high beams. The interesting thing is I tried the blue-ish tinge H4's and the new windscreen we installed in it actually attenuated the light through the windscreen. If you rolled down the door window and looked out, it was noticeably brighter. The new windscreen attenuated the blue spectrum. So putting in clear halogens still gives a decent white light with no notable attenuation through the windscreen.

I am not sold on the LED conversions currently. I would have to extensively test some brands for me to try them in an actual car. I wouldn't even try one with the little cheap looking fan on the backside. Our cars are daily drivers and I can't have nonsense breaking or failing from cheaply made products. I guess for a Sunday driver or once a month car, they might be ok. That's just not my cup of tea.

Cheers
Wow! 100w low beams!?! 140w high beams!?! That is almost getting to aircraft landing lights, eh? Have the authorities ever questioned your light brightness? I suspect those are "off road" use only lamps, but they would be a huge boost over stock lighting levels, for sure. Were you able to aim them well enough to not melt the retinas of oncoming drivers? :oops:;) :cool:
 

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Wow! 100w low beams!?! 140w high beams!?! That is almost getting to aircraft landing lights, eh? Have the authorities ever questioned your light brightness? I suspect those are "off road" use only lamps, but they would be a huge boost over stock lighting levels, for sure. Were you able to aim them well enough to not melt the retinas of oncoming drivers? :oops:;) :cool:
Howdy 70XL,

I hope you are doing well. So the thing that put me over the edge is that the newest cars and trucks have the brightest headlamps that are impossible for the oncoming traffic to deal with. Since NHTSA is not doing anything to regulate these cars and trucks. And by truck I'm specifically calling out the newer F-150's with those 4 lamps that all seemed to be aimed right in oncoming traffics pupils. Since you really can't fight them, why not join them and I use blue blocker night time darkened glasses. So yes I do wear my sunglasses at night, because: newer vehicles and ridiculous lumen output of new headlamps.

To your point of 100 Watt low beams and 140 Watt high beams, actually that is a small aircraft landing and or taxi lamp (they are 100W halogens). But you really can't go by wattage anymore simply because you are comparing LED vs incandescent at times. It's really now all about how many lumens per lamp; whatever that lamp may be. I do have the upper low/high beams adjusted normally so it's not a safety concern for others. However I did aim the lower set of low/beams (only come on high beam) so it does throw the light out and that would be obnoxious if blasted onto oncoming traffic.

To personally see just how obnoxious it was, there's a commercial section to our subdivision with rental hangers that are nearly a block long. So late night we parked out there and I walked to the end (about a block) and my better half flicked on the high beams from all off. Honestly it looked like that scene from Christine. Yuppers it was like UFO landed there.

About 20 feet away when you shut off the lamps you can still see the hot red filament glowing from that distance for about 5 seconds.

So my '68 XL and the '66 LTD and the '66 gal 500 XL are all getting the exact same bulb and wiring schema. Personally I'm still waiting for the crappy old Mopar alternator on the Dodge truck to not only implode but explode, haha, from 540 watts of high beams plus all the other accessories. Chrysler electrical systems were and quite frankly are still crap. I have a Ford voltage regulator on the Mopar alternator because the Mopar regulator died.

The other problem with our towns and cities is that no one is seemingly regulating the night time lighting of buildings and roads. I know they have banned in some parts Mercury Vapour lamps because the blueish light is too harsh for night time vision. I wish the US would honestly take a page out of Europes book and adopt low pressure sodium lamps. They produce a very narrow spectrum orange light that the human eye is really sensitive to. This is fantastic because it's closer to the red spectrum and the human eye recovers quicker for night time vision. That's why aircraft and other vehicles have a red light for cockpit viewing at night. The eye can transition much quicker to night time vision from it. The human peeper is to sensitive to this wavelength that means you only need a fraction of electrical power to power the lamp to see the same distance as with say a high pressure sodium lamp or even Mercury Vapour. So I would think this would appease the environmentalists, but as it turns out very, and I mean very few actually care.

Now to be fair there was a town called West Allis in Wisconsin that did adopt low pressure sodium. It was years ago but I remember how easy it was drive around town at night and there was no eye strain.

Sorry for the tangent but it was all kind of related. Nothing would please me more than with a highway regulation that is enforced concerning a white light colour temperature and overall lumen output maximums. I would happily comply, until then I will join the newer vehicles to actually see at night with bright lamps and night time specific spectrum blocking driving glasses.

Cheers
 

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Isn't Lumen a measure of light output and watts a measure of current draw.

While there is a relationship, it isn't the same when changing from one lamp type to the other

Correct?

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Isn't Lumen a measure of light output and watts a measure of current draw.

While there is a relationship, it isn't the same when changing from one lamp type to the other

Correct?

Action
Hello Action,

Yuppers Wattage is just the measure of electrical power and Lumens are a measure of light intensity. You cannot measure lumens in wattage whilst comparing an incandescent lamp and an LED lamp or any different kind of lamp for that matter. The reason will become very apparent. An incandescent bulb generates light by heat, which everyone knows. However the total electrical power in any lamp (filament, solid state, gas discharge, electro-chemcial) covers the light and heat generated or even noise (think loose transformer sheets in a ballast for a gas discharge lamp). An incandescent lamp generates more heat than light, whereas the other lamps mentioned generate more light than heat. I am not covering carbon arc lamps because those are outdated and not in use anymore, but the others are still mainstream.

That's why a 100 watt LED will generate much much more light than a 100 watt incandescent, simply because it's generating far less heat. That's why you cannot compare different functioning lamps in intensity from current alone. It's an unfair test. If I had, somehow, 140 watt LEDS's in the truck, the light output would truly be ridiculous on high beams. At that point it would be like an old studio carbon arc lamp lighting up the night as if it were day for filming.

Cheers
 

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Thanks for unscrambling my mind a bit

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Howdy 70XL,

I hope you are doing well. So the thing that put me over the edge is that the newest cars and trucks have the brightest headlamps that are impossible for the oncoming traffic to deal with. Since NHTSA is not doing anything to regulate these cars and trucks. And by truck I'm specifically calling out the newer F-150's with those 4 lamps that all seemed to be aimed right in oncoming traffics pupils. Since you really can't fight them, why not join them and I use blue blocker night time darkened glasses. So yes I do wear my sunglasses at night, because: newer vehicles and ridiculous lumen output of new headlamps.

To your point of 100 Watt low beams and 140 Watt high beams, actually that is a small aircraft landing and or taxi lamp (they are 100W halogens). But you really can't go by wattage anymore simply because you are comparing LED vs incandescent at times. It's really now all about how many lumens per lamp; whatever that lamp may be. I do have the upper low/high beams adjusted normally so it's not a safety concern for others. However I did aim the lower set of low/beams (only come on high beam) so it does throw the light out and that would be obnoxious if blasted onto oncoming traffic.

To personally see just how obnoxious it was, there's a commercial section to our subdivision with rental hangers that are nearly a block long. So late night we parked out there and I walked to the end (about a block) and my better half flicked on the high beams from all off. Honestly it looked like that scene from Christine. Yuppers it was like UFO landed there.

About 20 feet away when you shut off the lamps you can still see the hot red filament glowing from that distance for about 5 seconds.

So my '68 XL and the '66 LTD and the '66 gal 500 XL are all getting the exact same bulb and wiring schema. Personally I'm still waiting for the crappy old Mopar alternator on the Dodge truck to not only implode but explode, haha, from 540 watts of high beams plus all the other accessories. Chrysler electrical systems were and quite frankly are still crap. I have a Ford voltage regulator on the Mopar alternator because the Mopar regulator died.

The other problem with our towns and cities is that no one is seemingly regulating the night time lighting of buildings and roads. I know they have banned in some parts Mercury Vapour lamps because the blueish light is too harsh for night time vision. I wish the US would honestly take a page out of Europes book and adopt low pressure sodium lamps. They produce a very narrow spectrum orange light that the human eye is really sensitive to. This is fantastic because it's closer to the red spectrum and the human eye recovers quicker for night time vision. That's why aircraft and other vehicles have a red light for cockpit viewing at night. The eye can transition much quicker to night time vision from it. The human peeper is to sensitive to this wavelength that means you only need a fraction of electrical power to power the lamp to see the same distance as with say a high pressure sodium lamp or even Mercury Vapour. So I would think this would appease the environmentalists, but as it turns out very, and I mean very few actually care.

Now to be fair there was a town called West Allis in Wisconsin that did adopt low pressure sodium. It was years ago but I remember how easy it was drive around town at night and there was no eye strain.

Sorry for the tangent but it was all kind of related. Nothing would please me more than with a highway regulation that is enforced concerning a white light colour temperature and overall lumen output maximums. I would happily comply, until then I will join the newer vehicles to actually see at night with bright lamps and night time specific spectrum blocking driving glasses.

Cheers
Things are fine here, except for a cold snap that is probably a little sooner than we'd expect. That and the height of the snow bank in the front yard is closer to what we'd expect for March, not December. I thought I started throwing it far enough from the edge of the drive way to give me room for the years worth, but the bank is very high already. I think everyone is generally happy for the moisture, come spring, but the 35 - 40 below makes shovelling less fun. LOL

I hear you on the often horrible headlights on many of the new trucks and SUV's. Piercing and blinding with what should be designed and built with better alignment. Even worse is the people that "upgrade" their old halogen headlights with HID and LED lamps without realizing that the reflector housing is not designed for those different types of light source. That and the other guys who are determined to use the LED light bars they added to their lifted 3/4 and 1 ton trucks as they drive around town.

Speaking of driving around town, there are very few Sodium lamp street lights left around here. Most of the lighting has been replaced with LED's and with the more controlled reflector designs being used the scatter is greatly reduced. I sure notice how there is no more orange glow in the sky when approaching the city at night.

Stay warm!;):cool:
 

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Things are fine here, except for a cold snap that is probably a little sooner than we'd expect. That and the height of the snow bank in the front yard is closer to what we'd expect for March, not December. I thought I started throwing it far enough from the edge of the drive way to give me room for the years worth, but the bank is very high already. I think everyone is generally happy for the moisture, come spring, but the 35 - 40 below makes shovelling less fun. LOL

I hear you on the often horrible headlights on many of the new trucks and SUV's. Piercing and blinding with what should be designed and built with better alignment. Even worse is the people that "upgrade" their old halogen headlights with HID and LED lamps without realizing that the reflector housing is not designed for those different types of light source. That and the other guys who are determined to use the LED light bars they added to their lifted 3/4 and 1 ton trucks as they drive around town.

Speaking of driving around town, there are very few Sodium lamp street lights left around here. Most of the lighting has been replaced with LED's and with the more controlled reflector designs being used the scatter is greatly reduced. I sure notice how there is no more orange glow in the sky when approaching the city at night.

Stay warm!;):cool:
Howdy 70XL,

Every so nice to hear from you. Glad you're doing well in that inhospitable environment and the weather isn't great there either :)

You brought up some very good points about people doing lamp conversions. I've been researching the FMVSS here in the States and it turns out according to FMVSS 108 that putting a LED or HID into a composite lamp housing designed for halogen is indeed illegal. I think you guys have CMVSS up there, but I haven't looked into that. The US version isn't exactly a riveting read <yawn>.

I also was wondering if there was a limit on colour temperature for headlamps and unfortunately the harsh blue is legal. They draw the line (literally) on the chromacity chart for dark blues approaching UVA.

The wifey asked why she cannot have 4 low beams on the older 4 lamp cars. Well, it turns out you can. FMVSS does allow either the upper and or all lamps in a vertical arrangement to be low beams or the outer and or all lamps in a horizontal arrangement to be low beams. There are maximum candelas at certain beam angles that need to be adhered to, but if you're under it at those beam angles then why not all 4 on low beams as well. So it shall be. It might be prudent to print that part out and keep it in the car in case we're pulled over as proof it's legal.

On the topic of street LED lighting, it's even cheaper to limit the colour temperature to the low pressure sodium orange glow with LED's, but no one seems to do it. Low pressure sodium lamps are more expensive than high pressure sodium lamps. The high pressure sodium lamps have an orange tinge to them but are mostly a white light source as it's a combination of mercury and sodium forming the arc.

Back to the weather, Ug, I dunno how you can handle 30-40 below. It was -5 ˚F the other morning here and that was brutal. It was 55 ˚F and sunny today though, so not to bad. That I can handle. I did grow up in the midwest and I remember -40 below winters.

You have my respect for putting up with that. :)

Cheers


For those in the States curious about headlamp and other lamp regulations, I've attached the latest version of FMVSS 108.
 

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As we like to say here on the prairies, "but, its a dry cold". Another axiom we use is that there is no such thing as too cold, only bad clothing. ⛄❄:giggle: Next week we'll have above normal temps, so eventually it will average out.
 

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You guy better have a good alternator and battery. :)
 

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You guy better have a good alternator and battery. :)
Hello Iowan,

Yuppers you better believe it! I have R&R'd the 1G 60 amp alternator and the wiring. Whilst I admit this will be pushing the limits of the 60 amp 1G, it's better than having a Chrysler charging system. I also use a deep cycle Optima battery.

Cheers
 
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