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Discussion Starter #1
Previously had a ton of work done on my car to prep it for a long distance drive; Valve job, New Bearings, Differential work, Gaskets, brakes, Carb rebuild & many adjustments, new fuel filters, air filters, and more.
Mechanic said the car was ready to go, Full fluid changes, Oil, Transmission, Coolants, etc.

Made the drive and at 1000 miles, car started leaking LOTS of oil. Took it to a local mechanic that put it on a lift and cleaned the excess oil off bottom and showed me 2 places where it was leaking: Main Seal and Rear seals. I was due to leave in 4 days and he said parts alone would take 5-7 days to arrive, and another 1-2 days required to complete the needed work. I couldn’t stay that long so he suggested the temporary fix of Engine Stop Leak and said to check and top up the oil as needed on my drive back home, and to take my car to my local mechanic asap after arriving home.

So the car drove seemingly well on the open road on my return trip but took in 1 qrt of oil for every 60-100 miles of travel. Left Oil puddles underneath whenever parked, with droplets on the ground positioned all down the center of the car. Accelerated well on flat or low grade roads but trying to go up the Grapevine on southbound Interstate 5 Fwy, it wouldn’t go more than 40 mph. I mingled with the semi’s 18 wheelers and finally made it over that hill and the car did the normal (for me) speeds of 55-65-70 on free flowing highway stretches.
Anyway, long-story longer... WHAT is involved in the repair for the Main & Rear seals??? My garage-mechanic friends says it’s a major major job and the engine has to come out and costs will run high (?). UGH!

Can someone give me a more thorough but basic explanation of what’s needed / required?

Thanks MUCH, for any responses!
 

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The oil pan has a front and rear seal as part of the its gasket, and that can be replaced with the engine in the car. My '66 service manual describes that procedure assuming it's still in the. It's something I've done on my back.

BUT the rear main seal at the end of the engine crankshaft means engine removal. If the rest of the engine is solid, it should not be THAT expensive; but I'm in California too, so I understand what you're facing.

Ask your guy to explain how he's been successful with more commonly used rubber seals in contrast to the the classic "rope seal" when the engine as assembed back in the day.
Rear Main Rope Seal - There Are Alternatives For Many Older Engines
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you pkevins...
The mechanic up north said it was a minimum 8hr job so I’m guessing it’s the Rear Main Seal - I do appreciate your feedback - I’ll review that link now!
 

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It is possible to replace the rear main rope seal without engine removal. And it isn't easy.
I saw a tech in my shop do that once by unbolting the transmission, unbolting the flywheel/flexplate and dropping the crank shaft just a little after removing the oil pan

Far easier to do with a lip seal


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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you, Action.
That’s all good to know... Hopefully finding someone with the skills & know-how to fix it, won’t be as difficult!
 

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That skill set is becoming more difficult to find. As that technology is pretty old.

This artical may be of some benefit.

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That skill set is becoming more difficult to find. As that technology is pretty old.

This artical may be of some benefit.

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No disagreement with this reply about old techology nor the prior post that it is possible to replace a rear main seal "in place"; for better or worse that is what Ford's factory manual specifies for 200 CID engines, at least in 1966.

My motivation in inserting the link was to offer additional background so the OP can ask more questions to gain confidence the mechanic knows what s/he is doing and will respect the nuances of making vintage engines and rides work acceptably. It strikes me the lack of this knowledge or skill may have been a root cause of the flood of oil.

Having experienced more than one case where an ASE-certified resource did not acknowledge the relevant documentation, I fixed it myself or caused him to physically review the content to get it right. Overall he did good work but he's human.
 

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Having experienced more than one case where an ASE-certified resource did not acknowledge the relevant documentation, I fixed it myself or caused him to physically review the content to get it right. Overall he did good work but he's human.
Sometimes a tech just needs to read up on a repair before jumping in.

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for your replies, info and links. Feeling more informed & confident to speak with the mechanics for possible solutions. Much appreciated FFO!
 

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Have you thought about taking the car back to the mechanic that originally did the work? If he is reputable, he should stand behind the work that he did and fix the leaks at no charge.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Have you thought about taking the car back to the mechanic that originally did the work? If he is reputable, he should stand behind the work that he did and fix the leaks at no charge.
So I did return to my original mechanic; He basically said “The leak is a crankcase to transmission issue... We don’t do transmission work.“ He recommended a nearby Transmission shop, which I have not taken the car to, yet.

I recently did take my car to a Falcons/Mustangs Only shop... a recommendation also, but I RAN out of there terrified - as they quoted me $12-14 Thousand to do the Main & Rear Seals, claiming they would NOT guarantee the work unless I also had the engine bored and re-built, and replaced the Transmission, starter, alternator, radiator, all hoses & electrical, pistons, rings, bearings and gaskets, and a few other things. I commented, if I had THAT much liquid funds available, I could just look for a similar car in better shape! So I am compelled to get a 2nd or 3rd assessment from other shops.

I did not want to have to get rid of my car, but I surely can not afford $12-14K to repair it, and it is my daily driver. Definitely frustrating!
 

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Depending on what engine you have you can buy a reman engine
a heck of a lot cheaper than that
 

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Getting a second or 3rd opinion is recommended.

Instead of a speciality shop, I would look for some one that has been around for a long time or make repairing these vehicles is a hobby. Get recommendations from local car club.


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