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Discussion Starter #1
About to change out the intake manifold on this '11 crown vic and I don't have any torque values. Should've got the FSM when I got her back in May. Anybody happen to have access to this info? The bolts involved would be for the throttle body frame assembly, fuel rail, thermostat housing and manifold bolts.

Also I've been told that while I've got everything off to check some kind of hose or connection that runs under the manifold. What's this piece possibly called? I'd rather have the part on hand when I get going on this.
 

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About to change out the intake manifold on this '11 crown vic and I don't have any torque values. Should've got the FSM when I got her back in May. Anybody happen to have access to this info? The bolts involved would be for the throttle body frame assembly, fuel rail, thermostat housing and manifold bolts.

Also I've been told that while I've got everything off to check some kind of hose or connection that runs under the manifold. What's this piece possibly called? I'd rather have the part on hand when I get going on this.
http://www.torkspec.com/torkspecme.aspx?KI=11-4.6L-281ci-V8
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks got the part now.

I think my setup is a little different than the engines in the youtube videos I've been watching. I don't have the throttle cables and ports on either side of the aluminum part of the manifold..

ai.imgur.com_74fQNGS.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
To my surprise the manifold I unboxed didn't have embedded gaskets like I'd seen in all the videos. Mine came looking like this..

ai.imgur.com_8eQgjKz.jpg



I assume this would be the version that requires a separate gasket. Unless there's better advice I'll prob just go with a Felpro.

Actually, should I just return this one and get the embedded gasket version. Someone mentioned the seal on that one would probably never go bad.
 

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To my surprise the manifold I unboxed didn't have embedded gaskets like I'd seen in all the videos. Mine came looking like this..

View attachment 35826


I assume this would be the version that requires a separate gasket. Unless there's better advice I'll prob just go with a Felpro.

Actually, should I just return this one and get the embedded gasket version. Someone mentioned the seal on that one would probably never go bad.
I have never seen that type before
 

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I would ask the seller if there are no directions. The gasket material needed may be RTV.

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Discussion Starter #8
Seller has been written to so hopefully I'll get something back soon.

That coolant crossover in the front makes me want to use rtv on the gasket. Not sure if this is commonly done but it doesn't seem like it could hurt anything. Or could it?
 

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If the sealing item is a rubber O ring, do not use any sealer at all.

Gaskets like showed above are OK.

My reference to RTV was to use it as a stand alone without gaskets or other sealing.

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Discussion Starter #11
Yeah got word back from the seller that it goes manifold - gasket - head.

The big tube coming off the back of my EGR valve is mucho rusty so instead of making the separation there the plan is to remove the 2 (also very rusty) bolts holding the valve to the throttle body.

Does the EGR valve gasket need to be replaced when the valve is separated from the throttle body or is reusing the old one ok?
 

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Replace it!

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Discussion Starter #13
Feels like I'm always making baby steps here but I guess that's the way it is when you're learning a new vehicle.

After no small effort of getting everything over to my buddy's heated garage for the job I take everything off back to the 15mm crash bracket bolt, the one you can't see, and it just wouldn't budge. Used both a swivel head and wrench ratchet. Seems like I was able to get a good hold both times but when I went to twist the heads acted like they might've been rounded off. So I pulled out and put everything the f back together. Talked to a mechanic close by who will work on just the bolt for me so hopefully it won't end up costing too much.

Called one of the mechanics who used to work on this vehicle when it was part of a fleet and he was trying to convince me to let him do the entire manifold job because there was a process to burping the engine coolant that used a special vacuum tool. He said if the burping isn't done right that the engine will have hot spots. Is this true? I've got a hand powered vac tool if that's what he's talking about. Only place I could imagine applying vacuum would be at the reservoir cap. Could buy a second cheap cap and drill/adapt it to take a vacuum tube.
 

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Assuming the question is regarding removing air out of the cooling system after draining.

This is a concern in cooling systems since the 1990s. The 4.6l engine used to have a plug in the cooling system cross over just behind the alternator to let out air for this purpose. In addition it is not uncommon for the heater core to trap air. Since many times the heater core may be higher than the rest of the cooling system. Purging air is a big deal and can cause issues over heating areas in the engine if they have trapped air.

However air is usually not trapped in the engine long term. Typically the air will work it's way out after several start and stop cycles. That would require adding more coolant after the engine has totally cooled down and making sure the overflow reserveroir is filled. After the engine cools down it will suck in coolant if the air has moved to the radiator. Not monitoring cooling system after a drain and refill isn't something a repair shop can do easily. The job is done and the car is released to the owner. You as a DTI repair guy have that luxury! If all of the air works out later you can monitor the cooling system daily and add make up coolant to replace the air that is displaced in subsequent start stop cycles.

There are coolant refill machines that either fill under pressure and force air out of the system. Or fill by vacuum that suck in the coolant. The lower hose or connect to the lower radiator via an adaptor is connected to coolant and vacuum is applied to the radiator opening at the top. The vacuum removes the air and the coolant moves up to fill the system.

The system can be effectively filled the olfdfashion way and some engines are more difficult than others. The shop manual will give specifics on how to make that happen.

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