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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have 70" ford. and was wondering what i need to cover up before i spring clean it ha ha. i know the Air filter, distributor cap, and alternator maybe?

its looking pretty grimy and want it to be cleaner and easier to look at he he
 

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That's about it. All you need to do is make sure water doesn't get into the oil, engine through the carb or under the cap. Everything else will dry ok.
 

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Also make sure what ever you use will not stain the paint. I used some once on an old car and it stained the paint.

Try what ever cleaner you want to use on a small area under the hood to test the paint. I would also cover the windshield and fenders with something to protect the paint from any chemicals you may use if you really care about the paint finish.

Most cleaners are safe for paint but this varies on your paint age and condition.

Better safe than sorry.

Post up some before and after photos so we can see the results!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yeah im gonna do it maybe this sat. but no i was just gonna spray it with water and maybe degreaser on the bad parts. like a pressure washer just with water lol. and yeah im gonna post up befor and after =D see how nice it looks hehe
 

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not trying to threadjack or anything, but i've heard conflicting information on this. especially on newer vehicles, some have said to cover the alternator and coil packs with a plastic bag before washing. and others have said its not necessary as long as your not spraying the crap out of 'em with a power washer. i would think it would be ok to leave them uncovered and make sure everything's completely dry before running the engine. what are anyone else's thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah i have heard the same thing, but better safe than sorry, im gonna cover the air filter, distributer, and alternator. just to be safe =)
 

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Also on some of the mid 90's cars and up there was a clear type sticky film that was sprayed all over the engine compartment, it is called clear rust proofing. There was a guy on the other forum who thought it was just crud built up over the years and removed it, he didnt know it was rustproofing!
 

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The clear film on the aluminum parts is called cosmolene.It was used mainly on cars and trucks coming across the ocean to prevent salt contamination.VW was notorious for using it.You had to us a steam cleaner at the port of call to clean the stuff off.

If your worried about staining the paint with over splash from the cleaner,a trick is wet down the fenders and hood and grille work.It will dilute the spash before it sinks in esp on faded paint.

I used to use 409 on my engine comp to clean it up.It's cheap easy to use and not to harsh on the enviorment.Regular use keeps it pretty clean.Spay on a cold engine,let it soak in and water spray it off.Just remember to cover the Dist unless youu have a compressor to blow it dry.
 

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Then after it is all clean, Take tire spray foam cleaner and spray all over the place. Let it do its thing...It will look like new under that hood. Take a towel and wipe off excess where ever you want and also the radiator hoses to keep them looking NOT so shiny. This is a little trick I do for the car car shows....its so easy and looks like you spent days cleaning and detailing.
Here is one I did !
 

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wait. 70 inch ford? i know what you meant...

stymees'mont is right. i use to do that too, but now i just keep it clean all the time...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
wow lovely engine bay! i so wanna do that haha. doing a tune up this weekend, so might as well clean it at the same time =)
 

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Hi Jamesx22,
While I am a "newbie" to posting on this forum, I am not a "newbie" when it comes to auto repair 'n care.

My '92 Bronco has a V-8, some of the early electronics, with the rest being "pre-electronics; power packs, 1k+ in sensors, etc."

My 2002 Explorer XLT, is just the opposite of the above. There is a formula I use, when it comes to cleaning the engine bays on BOTH of these vehicles:

WallyWorld (Walmart): Crude Cutter (CC) - sold over in "Hardware", from 12oz to a 1 gallon jug, and moderately priced.
While you are there, go over to where the engine accessories are sold, buying whatever foaming tire cleaner you like.

Take you vehicle to a local car wash, keeping this in mind: The cleaner the car wash, the better maintained it usually is; better the sprayer wands work; more time for the quarter$ you feed the machine, or bill$ for that matter.

Without a doubt: cover your windshield, fenders, and clothespin an old, 100% polyester, bedspread, to the frontend of your ride. [Repeating here what I believe another already posted/suggested.] This is a must though, with Crude Cutter. However, Te$t$T a drop or two on the corner of your valve cover, airfilter housing, wheelwell covers, and so on. Let stand for a minute or two; rinse off, then dry. IF it did not dull or remove the paint, you're okay. IF it did, try the 409 post, as I have and it works okay.

Engine must be cool. The lower the "humidity, the better, too. Spray the Crude Cutter, starting at the top of the engine, to lower areas; corner where your battery is mounted, and all the way around, in a circle: this applies to earlier model engine bays [i.e. distributor, timing light, coil, few sensor$, etc.) vs. the later model bays, as described above.
The Crude Cutter works great on the electronic coverings, but questionable on "sensor housings". IF you have a sensor, and it has say two wires, going into a round, metal tube, which is open-ended, where the wires go into this housing, I'd avoid spraying the Crude Cutter on the open-end of this type of sensor. Wrap such an end with some simple, 1/2" masking tape, as Crude Cutter, watered-down, would be about as harmful.

Let this stand, per the instructions on the CC bottle.

Spray off the engine bay, beginning with the firewall, and spraying from side-to-side, and back to front. Doing the reverse spray pattern will leave you with a firewall coated with whatever you washed-off everything else!
IMPORTANT: A lint-free, shop rag. Wait, till the water stops dripping off the distributor cap; unclamp both sides of your cap, then move this as far away from your distributor as possible, an gently shake the cap for a minute. Next, take the rag and wipe-dry the entire inside of the cap, from top to bottom; visually inspect, especially the "contact posts" and center button, making sure there is no water or condensate on any of them. Inspect the rotor. IF damp or wet, remove same, shake it briskly, dry-off, then replace same in distributor; reinstall your distributor cap.
WAIT, till you see little, if any water, dripping-off the bottom of your engine bay. If so, then start your vehicle, letting it run till it reaches operating temperature. Once it does, remove your coverings, and drive it out.

Maybe helpful? I've found that replacing the battery posts "chemical rings", then coating the posts with NAPA's Battery Post/Terminal Spray, negates having these posts getting any of the "white, powdery-like" substance from attacking the posts/terminals, and ensures worry-free starting.

I sincerely hope my post helps you....

Respectfully,

Daverfl
 

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I used to use the product "Gunk" Engine Cleaner. Basically thinned diesel, at least that's what my nose told me. It worked great, and makes a complete mess out of your driveway.

We use a product called SuperClean de-greaser at work. We operate large engine and small gas-turbine driven natural gas compressors. This stuff is the best thing on the market that we have found. We even water-wash the turbines with it (the internals of the turbine). It is readily available, but you may have to order it. Test it on your paint first, like anything else. We haven't had any problems with it being incompatible with anything.

Products | SuperClean
 

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-Boghog - way back in the dim recesses of my mind, I remember 'cosmoline' being on weapons we were having shipped to us overseas. -Is the same thing you're talking about, Boghog? :smile5:
 
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