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I would add more air. That will not fix the banging noise. However it may ride a bit better. Any bounce should be handled by the shocks.

As to the extreme banging, you may need a friend to listen for the bang and ID location.

Things to note
Speed at which it occurs
Position of steering wheel
Terrain under which it occurs
Accelerating, deccelerating or steady speed

Action
 

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Discussion Starter #22
With your van on the ground and secured wheels solidly on the ground
reach the drive shaft and try to see if has slop in it
You then can see if it's a u-joint that is bad or play in your rear axle it self
I can not get any movement in drive shaft. No sign of any slack.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I would add more air. That will not fix the banging noise. However it may ride a bit better. Any bounce should be handled by the shocks.

As to the extreme banging, you may need a friend to listen for the bang and ID location.

Things to note
Speed at which it occurs
Position of steering wheel
Terrain under which it occurs
Accelerating, deccelerating or steady speed

Action
Action:
Banging does NOT occur at any speed on a smooth road.
On rough road, like going over center stripe or road edge serrations makes the banging at very slow speeds. No shake of feeling in steering wheel but center seat shakes violently. I removed all rear seats and bed etc and no change. Shaking most felt and heard at rear doors.
The wagon has been driven with me lying on the floor and I can not identify a source.
Happens at steady slow speed.
Also despite new shocks van has a lot of sway. Jumping on back bumper you can maker van sway like a rowing boat but looking underneath nothing appears to be making contact.
Tires are at 41psi as I said and firewall says 44psi max. What you recommend as to pressure? i think banging was less when tires softer.
 

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"On rough road, like going over center stripe or road edge serrations makes the banging at very slow speeds. No shake of feeling in steering wheel but center seat shakes violently."

For the above I would assume the sound is coming from the rear and not the front. And suspension not the steering.

If true, you might see if it can be isolated from the left or the right. If you can based on the rough surface, reverse the travel to see if the other side traveling over a rough surface is impacted.

Other possibilites -
Wheel and wheel mounting
Springs, spring packs and/or spring mounts
Axle mounting bolts
Spare tire or jack parts
Bumper, bumper brackets
Doors, door mounts or door adjustments
Roof attachments? Roof racks

The other thing to do would be to add weight. 3 or 4 hundred pounds. Humans may be easy and any weight. This moves the suspension to a different point or may load up the suspension does not make sounds.

The 90 E 150 I had was on the highest end of GVWR. Some would call that a heavy half. It was a van conversion. Ford built as incomplete and a company installed windows, seats carpet side and roof panels. In addition it could handle a lot of weight. (It towed a 7400 pound boat and trailer. Rather nicely) When loaded I kept the tires aired to the max or 50PSI. Unloaded I would let the pressure down to 44 or 45. It just seemed to ride better.

There is sway and then body movement. Sway is more side to side. The twin I beam suspension used in E Series did not have a front sway bar until the 1990s. The rear never had one. Sway bars restriction body movement from side to side or dipping when the vehicle is turning. Shocks restrict the up and down movement. They can do that independently or in tandem.. You have new shocks. They may not be big enough to dampen or restrict movement of the full sized van. Off roaders do go to a double front shock arrangement to further restrict chassis movement when traveling over very rough road at higher speeds.

And it is a high off the ground vehicle in stock format. Not much you can do with that as it is designed to be big and off the ground. Next time you replace tires consider a short one.

>>>>>>Action

>>>>>>Action
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I'm now convinced the banging and wallow is just the shocks while new and meant to be top quality are too weak. I've heard that adding a coil spring around the shocks a good idea. Any views or suggestions on this?
 

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Suspension parts in general

Springs, of any type, hold up the vehicle or body of the vehicle away from the tire/wheel assembly. During travel the wheels are allowed to move up and down while the body is more or less level. Over time the springs wear and allow the body to drop down. This may be only 1/4 to a 1/2 an inch and a half an inch is a significant amount of drop. If the whole system is designed around 4 inches of movement. Loosing a half an inch is over 10% loss in suspension travel.

Shocks - the sole mission of shock absorbers is to limit or restrict that suspension movement created by the spring travel. Nothing more nothing less. There is no weight carrying ability for shocks. The shocks dampen or restrict movement in both directions. In many applications the dampening is different for each direction. Weak shocks are shocks that have diminished ability to dampen movement.

Adding a spring to a shock does not fix a weak shock. It may help fix a weak spring that came with the car. That is poor fix for weak springs. Spring replacement should be considered.

It is my opinion that metal springs are good for about 30 to 40 years. Beyond that that vehicle may be level and look good however the original ride height has been lost. And the suspension system was designed for a certain height and spring capacity or movement.

>>>>>>>>>>Action
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Action:
You are beginning to sound like a bot??? You know I have the new upgraded five leaf springs you recommenced and you know I have new top of the line (?NAPA) shocks. I'm still rolling like a boat.
 

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I do not recall any of that.
Besides this forum, I participate in two others
Play on a couple of fb sites devoted to classic cars.
And I have 2 projects of my own that are active in my feeble brain. One at my home and one in Michigan. For different reason I am collecting parts not driving.

I recognize your avatar and remember you have an Econoline. The fact that you updated your signature helps too. (I wish other would do that because they forget to add year, model and engine a lot of the time) Beyond that, keeping track of the repairs on everyone's ride is exceed my RAM capacity. I have thought an external drive connected to the side of my head, but that would be an additional project that would be far down on my TO DO list.

Rolling eh!

You can play a little with air pressure in the tires. 2 PSI increments. That would be a cheap and EZ experiment. Increasing the pressure would take some of the tire side wall flexing. But that is only good for a little. If the rolling is like the QEII that tire pressure increase may work. But if you are getting tossed and turned like the SS Minnow well It sounds like NAPA's top of the line isn't working for your application.

>>>>>>>>>>>Action
 
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