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Discussion Starter #1
So I picked up a Fel Pro exhaust manifold gasket set from Auto Zone again going for the cheap stuff. I used a razor type tool to scrape the old gasket off (man so much easier to work on with the engine out of the car, LOL), and a metal ruler to check my heads and see if my exhaust manifolds were worped, and they look good. Then I spent some time cleaning the old bolts with a wire prush and WD-40. And I chased the threads in the heads, [hey that rhymes] and cleaned them out really good, yes should have done it when the heads were off, but oh well. I also took the wire brush to the exhaust manifold and got some of the rust off of it. So before I put them on I have a few questions.

QUSTIONS:

The gaskets have a shiny metalic side and a dull side, which side goes towards the engine, which side towards the exhaust manifold or header? Two AutoZone "experts" had two different opinions!

Do I put any type of goop on the gaskets or do they go on dry? My guess would be dry.

What goop if anything do I put on the exhaust manifold bolts before screwing them in. I know I can rule out LockTight, jk.

As I can no longer buy replacement bolts, can I replace a broken exhaust manifold bolt with a grade 5 (3 notches on the head) bolt, or should I use grade 8 (6 notches on the head). Please see picture below of the old bolts and a new grade 5 bolt..

I wonder if the rust will come back on the manifolds unless I coat them with something?

thank you and you can see more of the project here:

Small Block Ford 302 V8







 

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I always put the shiny side of the gaskets to the manifold, the paper side to the head. I've always put the gaskets on dry as well. You want to use a high temperature anti-seize. Loctite actually makes a product. At the end of the URL I will put a link and a picture of it.

Use the hardest bolts available. Make sure to use a torque wrench if at all possible on them. This way they will be tight but not over torqued.

Speedway has exhaust manifold dressing that looks promising. I would have your manifolds sandblasted clean. One looks very clean already, but I don't know how well the dressing will work on the other one. At the end of the post I will insert a link and picture.


Loctite® Copper Anti-Seize Lubricant (Automotive Aftermarket Only) - Product - Henkel

Hot Stuff Exhaust Manifold Dressing
 

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I have seen GM suggest a re torque of the exhaust manifold bolts after X number of miles.

Any thoughts on that?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
... You want to use a high temperature anti-seize. Loctite actually makes a product. At the end of the URL I will put a link and a picture of it...

Speedway has exhaust manifold dressing that looks promising... At the end of the post I will insert a link and picture...
Now that's what I call feedback, thank you very much for being so thorough and informative, huge help! I will chase down the products and give them a shot.
 

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The Loc-tite high temp antiseize is used primarly for brake parts,such as caliper slides and shims.I've never heard on people using it on exhaust bolts before.In the product MSDS sheets it states avoid prolonged exposure to high temp.Seems to me exhaust manifords are at high temps from the time you turn the key.

What I do in certain cases where the I might have to remove the manifolds some time down the road is replace the bolts with studs if room available and use brass nuts to hold the manifolds tight.Brass won't corrode to the steel studs and removal is relatively easy.
 

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The Loc-tite high temp antiseize is used primarly for brake parts,such as caliper slides and shims.I've never heard on people using it on exhaust bolts before.In the product MSDS sheets it states avoid prolonged exposure to high temp.

I find this very interesting. The product is rated at up to 1800° and makes me wonder if this is considered "normal conditions". The MSDS also states that this product is stable under normal conditions. Speedway notes that exhaust manifolds rarely get hotter than 1200°.

Maybe "spark plug anti-sieze' would be a better choice. You could always call Loctite and ask them before you install it.
 

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I find this very interesting. The product is rated at up to 1800° and makes me wonder if this is considered "normal conditions". The MSDS also states that this product is stable under normal conditions. Speedway notes that exhaust manifolds rarely get hotter than 1200°.

Maybe "spark plug anti-sieze' would be a better choice. You could always call Loctite and ask them before you install it.

I get a kick out of those product ratings. I used some hi temp paint once. It was rated to 1200* so I thought it would work on my hotrod's headers. Looked awesome when I was done but burnt off the outside radius of the bend withing seconds of starting the engine. Best stuff I found to use and it looked good for exhaust paint was the Bar-B-Q stuff. As for loctite on the exhaust bolts I wouldn't use it myself. I would use a grade 8 star lock washer and re-torque after a few heat cool cycles.
 

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wait we're talking about iron manifolds on an iron head right?
i never use gaskets between them if that was the case. less chance of warping when two exact same metals are right next to each other...
 

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oh, and the shiny side goes to engine. Mr. Gasket told me that...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
wait we're talking about iron manifolds on an iron head right?
i never use gaskets between them if that was the case. less chance of warping when two exact same metals are right next to each other...
Sounds logical, but if that was the case then why use head gaskets between an iron head and an iron block?
 

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Sounds logical, but if that was the case then why use head gaskets between an iron head and an iron block?

There is a little bit more pressure involved than at an exhaust manifold. Not to mention the coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Anti Seize

Is this the stuff?

Permatex, Anti-Seize Lubricant
Item # 81343 (133A)

Use in spark plug installation on aluminum cylinder head-equipped engines... [ahem] but if you read on it says and cast iron heads.

- Prevents corrosion
- Permits easy disassembly
- Will not wash away (no kidding don't get it on your hands)
- Eliminates galling, seizing
- Lubricates
- Withstands up to 1600 F

Use On:

- Manifold Studs
- Oxygen Sensors
- Hinges
- EGR Fittings
- Brake Anchor Pins
- Head Bolts
- Assemblies exposed to heat or corrosion
- Spark Plug Threads when installing in aluminum or cast iron heads.

 

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That will work but use it sparingly. A little goes a long way. Use gloves and try not to get it on anything but the studs or bolts. Also a big warning!!!!!!!! The use of any lube other than light oil will alter the torque needed to tighten the bolt/nut. The rule of thumb is to lower the torque setting by up to 30%. The anti seize reduces the friction between the threads so if you think you want 100# torque and go that tight you will be grossly over tightening the fastener and may even break it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OK, thank you all for your advice, I got the driver side exhaust manifold mounted using the anti seize compound and torquing the bolts to 24 ft lbs as recommended by the Haynes manual. (then I saw Canuck623's post about altering the torque settings do to anti seize on them, but they didn't break and felt snug but noth tight, so we'll see)

 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well I got the second exhaust manifold back on today. I tapped the holes, scraped the old gasket off, applied some anti seize and torqued the bolts.

Thank you all for following this long post and providing me your feedback, others will benefit from it, I know I did.

As always here's some pictures of the progress, and you can see more on my web page here:

Small Block Ford 302 V8 Exhaust Manifolds





 
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