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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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49 Posts
Sorry, I missed your question in my reply - our 62 was built in San Jose, Ca.
 

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1962 Falcon Sport Futura
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49 Posts
I learned something new today. I would never have guessed that black engine compartments on non-black cars was original from the factory.

Cool!

Bob
 

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14,168 Posts
Generally body on frame vehicles have inner fenders sprayed black. The inner fenders are painted and stored at a different time than the remainder of the body and other exterior sheet metal which was sprayed at the same time. During the assembly process, the inner fenders are not paired with the vehicle until much later after the paint process. Since the cowl (some may call that the firewall) is part of the body in a body on frame assembly, it is painted body color as the entire body (floor, roof, quarters, pillars and cowl) is painted all at the same time.

A unibody car that I have a lot of experience with is the 1961 to 1969 Lincoln Continental. In 1958 the Lincoln Continental changed from a body on frame to unibody frame.
For this car line that was build on the Wixom Assembly plant (as was Thunderbird) the inner and outer fenders were part of the unibody frame. The inner fenders including the cowl was body color. All of the third and fourth gen Lincoln Continentals (1958 to 1969) were painted that way. The engine compartment was not painted separately. That would have been an added step at an added cost.

It was also during the 1960s that paint as a cost was looked and changed. Engine paint and the labor to apply has a cost. One color is less money than more than one color. And more colors did not sell more cars. (Kind of going back to Henry's alleged quote, You can have it in any color as long as it is black.) For model year 1966 and later ALL engines used in all North American assembly plants were paint Ford Corporate Blue. It wasn't done because the company color was blue or Henry Ford II wanted it. It was done because it saved the company a lot of money not using different engine colors on the upper engine and engine tin. All engines had the same color. It save on paint and save a lot on labor. Most of the savings was on labor costs in the engine plants.

Later in a supreme cost savings hair cut, engine color was changed to grey. You may have guessed why. Grey was less money than blue.

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model t's origionally came in other colors. black became the"one" when it was found that it dried faster. the other colors would hold up the line
 

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If true, holding up the line costs money because it means less vehicles produced.
Which is the typical ways decisions are made.
The answer to these questions determines what changes happen

Will a change sell more vehicles?
Will a change cost less and sell the same amount of vehicles?
Is a change required because of law or market demand?

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Hi folks - when I was a teenager and had my first job, my boss’s son had a 65 Falcon muscle car. I was smitten!!!

Awhile back, I bought 63 Fordor with the thought of restoring but never got it done and sold it.

Ever since I’ve been looking for a good round body - either to restore or fully restored.

Found this one in my area but am interested in what you all think about the price. As the advertisement states, it’s not a muscle car but does get down the road.

Good deal or not?1963 Ford Falcon
Hi folks - when I was a teenager and had my first job, my boss’s son had a 65 Falcon muscle car. I was smitten!!!

Awhile back, I bought 63 Fordor with the thought of restoring but never got it done and sold it.

Ever since I’ve been looking for a good round body - either to restore or fully restored.

Found this one in my area but am interested in what you all think about the price. As the advertisement states, it’s not a muscle car but does get down the road.

Good deal or not?1963 Ford Falcon
As a fun daily driver it could be a lot of fun. I would talk him down to under 15k. A complete stock restoration might get pricey.
 
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