White eroded plugs, stuck plug, and part question | FordForumsOnline.com
  1. Welcome to FordForumsOnline! Our community is here to help you with any questions you have related to your Ford. If you are looking for a friendly community to hang out with other Ford owners you can look no further than our forums here! Registering is easy and free!

White eroded plugs, stuck plug, and part question

Discussion in 'Ford Crown Victoria' started by bradleyheathhays, Oct 4, 2018.

  1. bradleyheathhays

    bradleyheathhays Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    Just bought a '11 Crown Vic w/ 270k miles a couple months ago and finally got around to replacing the plugs today. They all looked like this..

    ai.imgur.com_mv63ijj.jpg

    ai.imgur.com_eZtpY1W.jpg

    All with heavy white deposits as well as both top and bottom electrodes eroded. Gap on these should be 41-47 and they were measuring about 80. So first question is what do the white deposits and eroded electrodes indicate?

    Everything was going well until I get to the last plug in cyl 4, all the way back on the left. Thing was/is in crazy tight. After cranking back and forth for a while the best I could get out of it was 1/8 turn. It moves fairly easily within that limit but comes to a dead stop at the ends of the turn. What could have caused something like this? I think the mechanics taking care of it before me were hacks. Car started out as a police vehicle then was a cab before I got it.

    My only idea is to heat the engine up and see if it'll twist out. Although I'd have to be careful as I'm sure hot threads would strip easily. Not really sure if that'd be a good idea.

    Any advice on how to proceed here?

    And last I broke a tiny clip at the end of the tube in the bottom center of this pic and have to replace it now...

    ai.imgur.com_r4I9fSh.jpg

    I think it's part of the evap system but not sure. Anybody know what it's called, part number, or how I would search for it on ebay?
  2. Dominick 1

    Dominick 1 Well-Known Member Respected Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2014
    Messages:
    6,478
    Likes Received:
    873
    Location:
    Parkersburg Wv
  3. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    12,626
    Likes Received:
    1,465
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ 85008
    The spark plugs look good. Just left in too long and not changed out. That is the reason for the excessive gap.

    The deposits are there from two reasons. First it is normal to get this type of deposits based on the fuel that is available. AND they accumulate in greater amount when the spark plug gap gets excessive. Less fuel burns completely and leaves more deposits.

    As to removing #4 - Your strategy is likely a good one. Tighten #4 until seated. Run engine until warm. Remove spark plug and don't burn your skin. #4 is back there and may have even more deposits. Heating the engine may soften the deposits such that spark plug removal is easier. And do walk the plug out in steps. Turn past the EZ part and then spin for a short amount. Re tighten and remove some more. Repeat this process until the plug is removed. Stripping the head isn't the end of the world yet why make that repair if you don't have to. Then change spark plugs more frequently. I think owner's manual will state something like replace every 75 to 90 thousand miles. I do 50,000 on my '06 Navigator with 5.4l 3 valve.

    Not sure what the clip looks like. And most of those dollar clips can be had at a Ford or Lincoln parts department for about ten bucks. Take the broken pieces to them.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
  4. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    12,626
    Likes Received:
    1,465
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ 85008
    Post script - new spark plugs are going to increase fuel economy and performance of the vehicle. With 207,000 miles you might consider replacing the O2 sensors. (There are 4) O2 sensors wear like spark plugs. The tips have a coating that after 100,000 miles makes the sensor read slower than a new one. (Slower is also relative because the time we are talking about is fractions of an engine revolution)

    The electronic engine control system tests O2 sensors on start up and while engine is running. That test is only to understand IF a signal is being sent. NOT how fast the signal is being sent. So a slow O2 sensor will test good for the system however the signal will always be slow. And the computer will be adjusting fuel trim for old engine running events based on the O2 signal.

    Since the spark plugs look like they have been neglected I bet the O2 sensors have been as well.

    If you are in tune with the way your engine runs, you will notice a difference with new O2 sensors. OH and you don't have to buy expensive ones. Generic ones that have the connector and a long enough pigtail are good enough. Ten to fifteen buck a piece should work.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
  5. bradleyheathhays

    bradleyheathhays Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    Thanks again for some great advice Action and Dominick. I'll go ahead and get on the O2 sensors like you suggest. I've heard people talk about cleaning these sensors by heating the end with MAPP gas, or something like that. But if the cheaper generic sensors will do there's really no reason to replace them with new.

    Now I've got suggestions to soak the plug well with either WD-40, PB Blaster or carb cleaner and see if that'll loosen it up some. I've heard mechanics say the best solution for stuck bolts is a 50/50 solution of acetone and transmission fluid. Think there'd be any problem using something like this?
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2018
  6. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    12,626
    Likes Received:
    1,465
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ 85008
    No issues with solutions like those IF you blow out any debris in the spark plug hole first. You don't want to create a new problem by sending chemical down into a spark plug hole to take debris down there with it. And small amounts of chemical is what you want to do if you are going to do anything. I am not sure any of that liquid chemical will do much to break through the build up. What it will do is lube the spark plug threads and make it easier to unscrew the plug. For that WD40 would be as good as anything else. After the plug is out you may want to crank the engine to move chemical out as well.

    Burning off deposits from the O2 sensor would work for a sensor that is newer. That is burning off a coating or deposits. Older O2 sensors will be eroded away like the spark plug that has a wide gap. Eroded O2 sensor won;t get better by cleaning with heat.

    And for cheap just get a new one. Not sure which engine you have ...
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/O2-Oxygen-...019209&hash=item1cb1d492e0:g:yY4AAOSwSrxbRHxJ

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
  7. bradleyheathhays

    bradleyheathhays Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    I mistyped. Mean to say there's no reason NOT to replace O2 sensors with the new ones being so cheap.

    I'd like to get more specific information on this Vic such as exactly what engine it has. Is there a website or email address I can send my VIN number in to and they'll give me all the specs for this car?

    My VIN is 2FABP7BV1BX107672

    After looking the VIN up the guys at Orilleys said mine is the base model with the 4.6 engine. That being the case should I get 4 of the O2 sensors at that ebay link and just plug them in?

    My impression is that there are 3 models of the VIC for '11...the interceptor, LX and base models. Do all these have the 4.6 engine?
  8. Action

    Action Moderator Staff Member Respected Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    12,626
    Likes Received:
    1,465
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ 85008
    Engine -
    That year all sub models only had one engine. The 4.6l. O'reilly isn;tthe best source for sub-model data. Badging on the car will indicate sub model. By far most iof the CV are fleet sales and to first responders. The VIN decoder below shows it is a Police Interceptor. The interceptor could have special things on the engine to protect it during HD use. Silicone hoses, additional coolers, or other added items to protect for the type of use.

    VIN
    There are a number of VIN decoders. Here is onehttps://vpic.nhtsa.dot.gov/decoder/

    You can go here https://owner.ford.com/
    And order an owner's manual or check for recalls at the bottom of the page

    O2 sensor -
    The ebay link was provided as an example. It may work, just investigate fully by entering your cars data t that seller's page. IF that is a good sensor buy both up stream and down stream sensors. (All 4) The connector for up stream may be different than down stream.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action

Share This Page