Ford Automobiles banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Camera lens Automotive tire Lens Finger Cameras & optics

Does anybody know what causes this residue? It’s a 2003 E-150 with 200k miles, always use Mobil 1 full synthetic. Running fine right now.
 

·
Administrator
2006 Lincoln Navigator
Joined
·
15,799 Posts
Welcome to the FFO!

Looks like moisture. Excessive moisture can accumulate for a number of reasons.
Short trips
Over extended oil change intervals
Water/coolant getting into the crankcase

How long has it taken for the residue to accumulate?
Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: TBIRD430

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome to the FFO!

Looks like moisture. Excessive moisture can accumulate for a number of reasons.
Short trips
Over extended oil change intervals
Water/coolant getting into the crankcase

How long has it taken for the residue to accumulate?
Action
Thanks Action. I’m up in cloudy Oregon with a solar-equipped van camper, so I’m idling a lot and driving short distances to charge up my house battery. So hopefully that’s the problem (and not water leaking into the crankcase).
I do change my oil faithfully, but can’t say I kept a record of how long the residue has been there.
 

·
Administrator
2006 Lincoln Navigator
Joined
·
15,799 Posts
Look at your profile and the specifics of Oregon were not listed. I have traveled most of Oregon and there is a climate difference between Eastern and Western.

If that is the issue, I would recommend a 30 minute drive somewhere with some speeds over 40mph.
Moisture will accumulate in the crankcase because the vent system is bringing in fresh air to remove blow-by gasses. When the engine is shut down, the moisture will condense on the cold engine. (After it cools) This is normal and not much to change that. Typically, the next drive cycle heats up the crankcase such that the condensed moisture is heated to vapor again and is sucked out via the crankcase vent system.

Which engine do you have in the E150?

Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: TBIRD430

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Look at your profile and the specifics of Oregon were not listed. I have traveled most of Oregon and there is a climate difference between Eastern and Western.

If that is the issue, I would recommend a 30 minute drive somewhere with some speeds over 40mph.
Moisture will accumulate in the crankcase because the vent system is bringing in fresh air to remove blow-by gasses. When the engine is shut down, the moisture will condense on the cold engine. (After it cools) This is normal and not much to change that. Typically, the next drive cycle heats up the crankcase such that the condensed moisture is heated to vapor again and is sucked out via the crankcase vent system.

Which engine do you have in the E150?

Action
Thanks Action, for the detailed responses. My E150 has the 4.2L V6. I bought the van for $6500 when it was 10 years old and had 49k miles on it. It now has 200k on it—I’m definitely happy I made that purchase (but I do wish the front brakes had 2 pistons on each caliper, like the E250).
 

·
Administrator
2006 Lincoln Navigator
Joined
·
15,799 Posts
Recommendation -
Replace the PCV. Not exactly sure what crankcase vent system that engine has. Or I would post a link/pic.

For the next oil change you might use an engine flush. Most fast-moving parts stores will have a bottle or can. It is likely mostly kerosene. Add the bottle and run the engine for 15 minutes with trans in park. (Do not drive vehicle with the flush) It will clean any crud that has built up.

Pretty sure you can up can upgrade the brakes if you find a donor vehicle for the spindles.
Calipers and rotors would be bought new.
Seems like a lot of work though.

Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: TBIRD430

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Recommendation -
Replace the PCV. Not exactly sure what crankcase vent system that engine has. Or I would post a link/pic.

For the next oil change you might use an engine flush. Most fast-moving parts stores will have a bottle or can. It is likely mostly kerosene. Add the bottle and run the engine for 15 minutes with trans in park. (Do not drive vehicle with the flush) It will clean any crud that has built up.

Pretty sure you can up can upgrade the brakes if you find a donor vehicle for the spindles.
Calipers and rotors would be bought new.
Seems like a lot of work though.

Action
Both the PCV and the EGR were replaced at 80k miles. Would you still recommend replacing the PVC again at 200k?
Thanks again.
 

·
Administrator
2006 Lincoln Navigator
Joined
·
15,799 Posts
Yes.

Action
 
  • Like
Reactions: TBIRD430

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Thanks Action, for the detailed responses. My E150 has the 4.2L V6. I bought the van for $6500 when it was 10 years old and had 49k miles on it. It now has 200k on it—I’m definitely happy I made that purchase (but I do wish the front brakes had 2 pistons on each caliper, like the E250).
I agree that it is probably moisture caused by your driving process - i.e., short trips at low speed. I also have used Mobil1 exclusively since 1995 and have never seen this condition - probably because all my cars are driven relatively long distances and usually on the freeway. There is another possibility for the moisture (although very remote chance) and that is that there is a small head gasket leak. Yes, if that were the case, you should have probably seen moisture bubbles on the dipstick, maybe some steam out the exhaust, etc. by now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
I also suggest that is just moisture. Vehicle should be driven longer distances, with a HIGHER frequency.

There is no real harm here. I like the ideal of an engine additive before your next cycled oil change just for piece of mind.

Good luck,
Jon in TX.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top